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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,606 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 462 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 416 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 286 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 260 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 254 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 242 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 230 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 218 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 166 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 21, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for New England (United States) or search for New England (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 1 document section:

and taxation, whilst opposed to them were the veteran troops, the immense fleets, and the Inexhaustible resources of the most powerful empire of the world, the New England States openly set up the standard of separation, and of what they now style rebellion. The press and the pulpit denounced in the most furious language every mared not the winds of heaven to visit the Federal authority too roughly. The Washington Administration of that day treated with the utmost forbearance these New England secessionists. They neither demanded any extraordinary powers from Congress, nor enforced, to their full extent, those with which they were invested by the Conresult proved the wisdom of this conduct and covered the cause of America with glory, whilst it consigned its enemies to universal shame. But no sooner did New England again attain ascendancy in the national councils than the spirit of the alien and sedition laws revived. The traitors of 1812 became the tyrants of 1861. They