hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 4 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 2 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 29, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 29, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Rip Winkle or search for Rip Winkle in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

on getting into the Yankee nation are quite fresh and readable. We have received a copy of Times containing his first letter after the change, dated from New York. He says: There is a strange shadowy sense of unreality attached to passing 16 months in and about Richmond, and then waking up to find oneself in Washington. To describe such a transition would demand not only unrivalled descriptive and antithetical excellence, but also some such quaintness of conceit as has exhibited Rip Van Winkle starting from his long slumber in Steeply Hollow. In Richmond the spectator has for months and months been familiar with war about his path and about his bed, and at all his meals and under every roof. War is breathed in at every breath, waited upon every breeze, heard in every sound, visible at every step. For grace and elegance and lettered ease there is neither time nor superfluity of resource; nor, it must be added, are they compatible with the sublime earnestness of temper exhibi