Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 16, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Gen Sedgwick or search for Gen Sedgwick in all documents.

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terrific battle yet fought closed to day. Lee's entire army has made repeated and furious assaults up on our right and left wings, commanded by Hancock and Sedgwick, with temporary successes, but has been driven back with great slaughter. An attack was made about 4 o'clock this afternoon, simultaneously, upon our whole fine, which was gallantly repulsed. Towards dark the enemy concentrated upon our extreme right and fell suddenly upon Sedgwick, crushing in a portion of his line. Gen Sedgwick succeeded in reforming his line and securing it against further disaster, and the enemy withdrew from his front under cover of the darkness. Gen Sedgwick succeeded in reforming his line and securing it against further disaster, and the enemy withdrew from his front under cover of the darkness. Our losses have been heavy. Our army to-day has certainly achieved a decided success. It has baffled all the offensive efforts of the enemy. The almost impenetrable woods with which the battle ground is covered saved the rebels from a crushing defeat, as it enabled them to conceal their movements almost perfectly until t
c. We surrender a large portion of our available space this morning (says the Gazette) to such details of the bloody battle of Friday as are furnished by the army correspondents of the Philadelphia and New York journals. Contrary to the received opinion, the correspondent of the New York Tribune, writing from the battle-field Saturday evening, states that Gen Lee simply fell back to another line, and attempted to bring on another engagement by bold and persistent skirmishing. Major Gen Sedgwick was killed Tuesday. A ball entered his eye and passed through his head, killing him instantly. Gen Wright has been placed in command of Gen. Sedgwiek's corps. Dispatches from the army of the Potomac, dated 5 o'clock Tuesday evening, have been received at the War Department. Both armies then held their respective positions at Spotsylvania C H, without any material change. The enemy had been driven to his breastworks, his first line of rifle pits having been carried by the 6th c