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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 32 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 17 1 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 10 0 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 25, 1864., [Electronic resource] 8 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 4 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 25, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Albert G. Jenkins or search for Albert G. Jenkins in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 2 document sections:

Death of Gen. Albert G. Jenkins. Intelligence has been received of the death of Brig. Gen. Albert G. Jenkins, who was severely wounded in the fight near Dublin Depot, Southwestern Virginia, on the 8th inst. It is but a few days since a dispatch was received announcing his improving condition, and his friends looked forward wBrig. Gen. Albert G. Jenkins, who was severely wounded in the fight near Dublin Depot, Southwestern Virginia, on the 8th inst. It is but a few days since a dispatch was received announcing his improving condition, and his friends looked forward with pleasure to the period of his recovery, and his restoration to a position of usefulness to his State and country. But his strength gave way under the operation of the removal of an arm at the shoulder joint, and be failed to rally again. Gen. Jenkins was a member of the old United States Congress, and was elected to the FirsGen. Jenkins was a member of the old United States Congress, and was elected to the First Congress of the Confederate States, but resigned the latter position under the belief that he could be of more service to the country in the army.--He proved his gallantry on several occasions, and at last sealed with his blood his devotion to the cause. He was a gentleman of talents, had earned distinction in the forum as well
The Wounding of Gen. Longstreet. --The following letter from Captain Taylor, refutes the rumor that Gen. Longstreet was wounded, or that Gen. Jenkins was killed, by the fire of Mahone's brigade. Richmond, May 24, 1864. To the Editor of the Enquirer: Sir: It has been generally rumored, and indeed, has appeared in some of the public prints, that the troops of Mahone's brigade wounded Lieut, Gen Longstreet and killed Brig. Gen. Jenkins. I am in receipt of a letter, addresseBrig. Gen. Jenkins. I am in receipt of a letter, addressed to me by direction of Lieut. Gen. Longstreet, in which he exonerates that brigade from the charge. Did I possess facilities, I could with equal readiness, refute the charge in reference to the death of the lamented Jenkins. Justice to these brave and true men, who have so scarcely attested their valor, and of whose numbers so large a proportion has fallen, killed or wounded, in the pending battle, demands this contradiction of the imputations cast upon them. I am, Colonel,Your ob't ser