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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 260 6 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 124 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 104 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 82 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 78 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 75 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 72 50 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 70 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 70 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 69 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 8, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) or search for Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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r coming out some twelve or fifteen miles, feeding and resting our wearied horses, the command, "Saddle up," was again heard, and Thursday night found us a little nearer Memphis on the same road. Just before sunrise on Thursday morning, as we were silently lying in ambush, each one eager for the fray, we heard them coming. They were in great glee over something, laughing and hallooing as they came, and we afterwards found out they were making themselves merry over a picture of the "Fort Pillow massacre" in an illustrated paper gotten up by Mr. Frank Leslie. On they came, poor fools, little suspecting the fate that awaited them. When within about thirty yards of us, their leader about opposite the left of our company, the signal was given, and — well, nine fell dead and one wounded, while clear and distinct above the roar of our arms rang out the clarion voice of Capt. Floyd, "Charge'em, boys" which was done in handsome style, I assure you. There were nineteen Yanks in the squ