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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 36 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 32 4 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 20 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 18, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Macaulay or search for Macaulay in all documents.

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Dixhuit Juin. This is the 18th of June--"a day," says Macaulay, "which, if the Greek superstition retained its influence, would be held sacred to Nemesis — a day on which the two greatest princes and soldiers of modern times were taught, by a terrible experience, that neither skill nor valor can fix the inconstancy of fortune." The princes alluded to were Frederic and Napoleon — the battles by which they were taught so much were Colin and Waterloo. It is of the latter that we desire to say a few words, deeming the occasion not inappropriate, since there is nothing around us but war and rumors of wars, and the people will read of and listen to nothing else. The incidents of this battle, and the claims of those who were concerned in it, are as hotly contested now as they were during the first year that succeeded its occurrence.--The French say that they would have won it but for the folly or treachery of Grouchy; the Prussians say it would have been lost but for their opportu