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The Daily Dispatch: June 20, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 20, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for William J. Jacobs or search for William J. Jacobs in all documents.

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head; W. H. Timberlake, do.; Thomas Payne, flesh wound in arm; Samuel A. Frayser, left side, face and neck. Missing and supposed to be captured: Private John J. Omenhauser. The following is a list of the casualties in Sturdivant's Battery, of Richmond, in the fight of Wednesday: Wounded. Lieut. W. H. Weisiger, in thigh, Lieut. B. H. Gorrell, in two places; Corporal J. S. S. Casler, in neck, slightly; James T. Rippetoe, in the hip, slightly; B. C. Hall, hurt by a wounded horse; Wm. J. Jacobs, slightly by a concussion from a shell; J. D. Carver, wounded and missing. Missing and supposed to be captured: Capt. N. A. Sturdivant; privates J. W. Munday; J. R. Ferguson, Harvey Shepherd, E. A. Thacker and J. E. Drumwright. Two pieces of the battery were captured, and fifteen horses killed and captured. The name of Lieut. Col. J. C. Council, of the 26th Virginia, has been furnished to us on good authority as among the wounded, but the Petersburg papers report him captured
e this paper is in the hands of its readers, he will be looking after the venturesome horde of plunderers. Precisely what this invasion means we are not now prepared to say. It may be intended for something more than a more horse stealing operation. It is the opinion of prominent Union men of that State that it does mean a good deal more; that State officials not only do not object but favor it; that it is the beginning of a movement to put into operation the plan proposed by Lieutenant Governor Jacobs for cutting the communications of Sherman and forcing his army to retreat from Georgia; that it is in a word, the inauguration of a formidable rebellion in Kentucky--as formidable, at least, as the sympathizers with treason are capable of making it. This point a few days will decide, if the apprehended conspiracy shall be developed; it the sympathize in the State shall join hands with the invaders, and especially if the civil authorities shall be implicated in this affair, then the