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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 20, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for R. E. Lee or search for R. E. Lee in all documents.

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Yankee army, a great number of whom are said to be lurking about in the woods in that direction. A dispatch from General Lee, dated Friday night, says: "troops assaulted and carried our hear Bermuda Hundred, with on our part." He ent indications point to such a conclusion, without the accomplishment of his purpose. Grant thought he had out generaled Lee, and would take up his position in front of Petersburg before that commander was aware of his intentions; but General Lee General Lee was too smart for him in this instance, as in every other since the opening of the campaign. The situation at Petersburg is now highly favorable, and we learn that the military authorities are much encouraged at the prospects. A Sunday rumarations were made to attack this morning, but the enemy retreated in confusion. Our troops are in pursuit. (Signed) R. E. Lee, General. [from our own correspondent.] Lynchburg, June 19. --The enemy made a feeble attack on our lines
ceived that this movement is understood to be a following up of the enemy, who is supposed to have fallen back from his lines between the North and South Auna — a conception which does injustice to the generalship of our commander. It was not Lee but Grant that took the initiative. Lee would gladly have remained in his lines along the South Auna, and would willingly have awaited battle there, but he was forced out of his cherished position, just as he was compelled to evacuate the lines oLee would gladly have remained in his lines along the South Auna, and would willingly have awaited battle there, but he was forced out of his cherished position, just as he was compelled to evacuate the lines of Spotsylvania, by an offensive movement threatening his communications — a movement bold in conception and masterly in execution "I here are," says the Archduke Charles, "battles which are already won by the mere direction of the strategic line of advance."In a like sense it can be fairly claimed that by a couple of days' marching this army has gained a victory more substantial than a week's hard pounding could in the situation we have won; and that we are entitled so to regard this great flan