hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,788 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 514 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 260 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 194 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 168 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 166 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 152 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 150 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 132 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 122 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 1, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

hundred, whilst ours cannot be over eight hundred. Mahone's division lost about four hundred in all. The enemy's prisoners say they have been mining for over three weeks. This mine of the enemy was about twenty-five feet below the surface of the earth. The prisoners all say that they have other mines, which they will spring in a few days. Whilst the contest was going on in Johnson's front, the enemy made a demonstration in front of Harris's Mississippi brigade, demanding its surrender, inasmuch as they had broken our lines at another point and were carrying everything before them.--General H. replied that he would never surrender the works, but if the enemy wanted the works they might come and take them, provided they could. Among the anecdotes of the day it is related of a Capt. Richards of Pennsylvania, that finding himself about to be taken he threw himself in a suppliant attitude, and cried. "Take my watch, my coat and purse, but for God's sake save my life!"
spring in a few days. Whilst the contest was going on in Johnson's front, the enemy made a demonstration in front of Harris's Mississippi brigade, demanding its surrender, inasmuch as they had broken our lines at another point and were carrying everything before them.--General H. replied that he would never surrender the works, but if the enemy wanted the works they might come and take them, provided they could. Among the anecdotes of the day it is related of a Capt. Richards of Pennsylvania, that finding himself about to be taken he threw himself in a suppliant attitude, and cried. "Take my watch, my coat and purse, but for God's sake save my life!" Sunday, 31st. All quiet to-day. Our wounded are being cared for, and the dead of both sides in our lines are being buried. Still they come. Saunders has just sent in another battle-flag, thrown away by the enemy yesterday, and picked up by General S's men this morning. General Saunders reports that he ha
New York papers of the 27th contain a variety of items and speculations about the new advance into Maryland of the Confederate forces. General A. P. Hill's corps has already reached General Early, according to advices received in Washington Tuesday, and the plan of the Confederates was supposed to comprise a small raid into Pennsylvania as a feint, and a dash in heavy force on Washington city. The papers think that the withdrawal of the sixth and nineteenth corps from the pursuit of Early (with the view of sending them back to Grant) was the false move that has started this new rebel invasion. They had gotten back as far as Rockville, Md., on their return to Washington. It appears that General Joseph E. Johnston, who was removed from the Army of Tennessee, is the officer who is in command of the new invasion, according to the New York Herald Baltimore was full of rumors, some of which are given in the telegrams which follow, dated the 26th: Among the rumors prevalent was