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ash forward and the Yankees give back in their sui generis rabid style into and beyond the line of breastworks. Our men pursuing, mount the breastworks, and bestow upon the enemy a plunging fire, which tells with great success upon their ranks. Besides driving the enemy back, Mahone's men captured and brought off ten colors, forty officers, including Col. White, 31st Maine, and Col. Wills, 56th Massachusetts, and four hundred and six prisoners, including twenty negroes. In this charge Col. Weisiger, commanding Mahone's old brigade, was wounded whilst leading his brigade with conspicuous gallantry. The conduct of Capt. J. B. Girardey, A. A. G. to Gen. Mahone, on this as on a dozen other battle fields of the war, gave unmistakable evidence of cool courage and self possession and the highest qualities of the skillful officer. But the work was not ended yet — only a portion of the lines had been retaken; the salient and the rent produced by the explosion still remained in p
ash forward and the Yankees give back in their sui generis rabid style into and beyond the line of breastworks. Our men pursuing, mount the breastworks, and bestow upon the enemy a plunging fire, which tells with great success upon their ranks. Besides driving the enemy back, Mahone's men captured and brought off ten colors, forty officers, including Col. White, 31st Maine, and Col. Wills, 56th Massachusetts, and four hundred and six prisoners, including twenty negroes. In this charge Col. Weisiger, commanding Mahone's old brigade, was wounded whilst leading his brigade with conspicuous gallantry. The conduct of Capt. J. B. Girardey, A. A. G. to Gen. Mahone, on this as on a dozen other battle fields of the war, gave unmistakable evidence of cool courage and self possession and the highest qualities of the skillful officer. But the work was not ended yet — only a portion of the lines had been retaken; the salient and the rent produced by the explosion still remained in p
dred privates, representing four divisions of Burnside's corps. Among the prisoners were some 20 negroes. The slaughter of the enemy during the engagement is represented by distinguished officers as the severest of the war for the numbers engaged. The battle-field is literally strewn with dead negroes. The firing ceased at 9 o'clock, but it is understood we will renew the attack at 2 o'clock. Among the casualties are General Elliott, of South Carolina, severely wounded; Colonel Weisiger, commanding Mahone's brigade, slightly; Major Woodhouse, slightly; the gallant Captain Girardy, Mahone's Assistant Adjutant General, slightly. During the fight the enemy's grape and shrapnel fell thick and fast in the outskirts of the city. Our loss in prisoners is not believed to equal our captures. The Yankee prisoners say Grant has been mining three weeks. [Second Dispatch.] Petersburg, July 30. --About two o'clock to-day, everything being arranged, General Mah