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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 611 5 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 134 60 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 70 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 48 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 48 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 41 41 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 28 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 9, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Deep Bottom (Virginia, United States) or search for Deep Bottom (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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s lines by storm. It is very natural and proper that this should be so. No one ventures to deny that we had on that occasion four corps massed against a position held by three divisions, and the army may naturally wonder whether it will ever succeed again if it is to fail with such odds in its favor. No stratagem to gain an advantage in numbers at the point of contact was ever more admirably contrived or more successful than that by which General Grant got the bulk of Lee's army over at Deep Bottom at the time when this assault was to be made; but it was a great failure not to seize resolutely, what this advantage placed within our reach. Whispers that the army did not fight well are absurd, as applied to this event; for not enough of the army was put in to give it a chance to win. Were our generals over sanguine of the result? Were they so certain of success that they did not employ men enough to secure it? Were they saving the troops for a great day's work after Petersburg had