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The Daily Dispatch: August 23, 1864., [Electronic resource], Letter from the Secretary of the Treasury. (search)
Letter from the Secretary of the Treasury. G. A. Trenholm, the new Minister of Finance of the Confederacy, has written a letter in reply to one from Governor Bonham, of South Carolina, which will be read with interest by the people. We copy it in full: Treasury Department, Confederate States of America, Richmond, August 5, 1864. To His Excellency Governor Bonham: Dear Sir: Your very kind and encouraging letter of the 30th ultimo was received yesterday. If it shall prove to Excellency Governor Bonham: Dear Sir: Your very kind and encouraging letter of the 30th ultimo was received yesterday. If it shall prove to be my happy fortune, through the Divine blessing, to contribute in any degree to the welfare of my country, I shall be more than compensated for all the labors and anxieties to which I have been appointed. Expressions of confidence and good will on the part of my fellow- citizens, such as you have been good enough to convey to me, are most grateful and encouraging. I regard the Treasury of the Confederate States as most peculiarly the treasury of the people, and there is nothing in the power o
The Finances. Mr. Trenholm, who seems to be quietly and assiduously pursuing his measures for recruiting the credit and the means of the Treasury, has written a letter to Governor Bonham, of South Carolina, on the subject of the Confederate Finances, which has been published by the South Carolina papers. In this letter he says "there is nothing in its (the Treasury's) present condition to inspire alarm, but, on the contrary, every motive for confidence." He endeavors to disseminate the idea that the Confederate Treasury is the "Treasury of the People," and that it must sustain them and they must sustain it. Mr. Memminger's policy was more constricted.--Formerly the Treasury was a sort of Car of Juggernant that rode over people, and was entirely independent of them. Mr. Trenholm desires to ameliorate the relations between the department and the public and to restore it to their confidence. He attributes the loss of confidence in the Confederate securities, in part, to the meas