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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 296 8 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 64 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 54 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 48 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 44 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 24 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 18 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 29, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Mobile Bay (Alabama, United States) or search for Mobile Bay (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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The fight in Mobile bay. The following is a letter from the late executive officer of the Tennessee, which we publish as the first account of the fight in Mobile bay from any person who was on board that ship during the action: United States Frigate Potomac,Pensacola bay, August 12, 1864. Notwithstanding you must have heard of the loss of our dear old ship, and of my becoming a prisoner in the hands of the enemy, I fancy that a short note from me would not be unwelcome, nor be consiMobile bay from any person who was on board that ship during the action: United States Frigate Potomac,Pensacola bay, August 12, 1864. Notwithstanding you must have heard of the loss of our dear old ship, and of my becoming a prisoner in the hands of the enemy, I fancy that a short note from me would not be unwelcome, nor be considered superfluous at this time. We were certainly under the heaviest fire that ever a ship received since the war began. Three strong and formidable iron-clads, one of them certainly our equal, and fourteen regular men-of-war, were playing on us at the closest possible quarters, with nine, eleven and fifteen-inch solid shot, and with apparently no intermission from the time we regularly engaged the fleet until the time of surrender, a period of probably an hour. We met them as they entere