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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Sherman or search for Sherman in all documents.

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ix Hundred gallant Georgians Are ready for the fight. Each heart beats high and holy, As with measured step they go, For they stand between their firesides And the invading foe. The battle rages fiercely; Has raged since break of day; And Sherman's fatal battery, With corpses, strews the way. Cries Beauregard, with thrilling voice, As is the trumpet's call, "Forward, brave comrades, to the charge, That battery must fall!" Six Hundred gallant Georgians-- With quickened step they go;slowly On the gory battle-field; And to Southern rights and valor The Northern hirelings yield. The setting sun looks sadly, Where the dead and dying lay, On the ghastly field of battle. The Six Hundred! Where are they! Five deep round Sherman's battery They lie at set of sun! But the battery is taken And the red field is won! Sixty of the Six Hundred Stand round their leader now, But death's eternal shadow clouds His vainly-laureled brow. Oh! Georgia's glorious chivalry! Th
The war News. General Hood, in an official dispatch on the 7th, states that the enemy still hold their works, one mile and a half beyond Jonesboro'. Sherman left in Jonesboro' such of our wounded as fell into his hands when Hardee withdrew on the night of the 1st. Our wounded report, and General Hood mentions it in his dispatch, that while in Jonesboro', Sherman declared that he proposed resting his army a few days in Atlanta and then marching directly upon Andersonville. PetersSherman declared that he proposed resting his army a few days in Atlanta and then marching directly upon Andersonville. Petersburg. The only thing of interest in Petersburg yesterday was the artillery firing mentioned in the telegram to be found in another column. Grant is supposed to be awaiting reinforcements, to be sent him when they shall have been drafted. A letter from General Lee. The following is an extract from a letter from General Lee, complimenting the North Carolina troops for their late achievement at Reams's station: "Headquarters Army Northern Virginia, August 29, 1864. "His Excel
you have acknowledged secession in your Constitution; we will quietly walk out." In this way the Union would go to pieces, and the country we tried to save be broken up by the very compromise that was intended to preserve it. We can make no compromise but what will break up the Government. The only way to get out of the war is to fight it out. (Applause.) "But these peace men say the North is exhausted. Are we exhausted? The cost of this war is not one-half of the profits of the country. We have never been as wealthy as now, and there are three millions of men in the North who have not yet shouldered a musket in this war. Are we exhausted? General Grant has the rebellion by the throat in front of Richmond, and the General has told a United States senator that he would not let go his hold even if New York, Philadelphia and Washington should be burned. Sherman is all right at Atlanta, and we will crush this rebellion if we are not pulled off by the traitors of the North."
The New York Herald of 6th has been received. The Herald contains a long account of Sherman's operations at, and south of, Atlanta. It speaks of his movement against Jonesboro' as "ShermSherman's brilliant feat, which has given Atlanta to the Union army and demoralized, if not destroyed, the army of the enemy." Day of thanksgiving. Lincoln has issued a proclamation that next Sualute was fired at the different arsenals throughout the United States at noon on the 6th. Sherman's losses. Sherman reports his losses at only one thousand two hundred. National thanks.Sherman reports his losses at only one thousand two hundred. National thanks. Lincoln tenders the national thanks to Farragut, Canby and Sherman. Great News Expected. The Herald's Washington dispatches report cheering news ahead from other quarters than Atlanta, Sherman. Great News Expected. The Herald's Washington dispatches report cheering news ahead from other quarters than Atlanta, and hint at the speedy capture of Mobile, and some important movement of General Grant, which will put Richmond in greater danger than it has ever been in before. The latest telegrams from the U
From General Hood's army. Macon, Ga., September 7. --Yesterday our advance drove the enemy from Jonesboro' and recaptured the hospital, containing ninety of our wounded. Sherman continues to draw back his forces towards Atlanta, for the purpose, it is reported, of strengthening the works on the eastern, western and southern approaches thereto. Fifteen hundred will cover our losses from all causes in the battles and skirmishes of last week. The army is now in fine spirits.
have never served. First. There are believed to be upwards of eight thousand men, of conscript age, belonging to the State Government of Virginia alone. Fully as many are attached to each of the State Governments of North Carolina, Georgia and Alabama. Here are thirty-two thousand men at once — a powerful army of themselves. If General Lee had them well disciplined at this moment, he would settle with Grant before another week had passed over our heads. If General Hood had them, Sherman would leave Atlanta much laster than he came to it. By some means or other these men should be come at. The Confederate Government cannot do it, but the State Government can, by the simplest process in the world. Let each State Legislature be assembled at once, and take measures to place all State officers, who are of the required age, at the disposal of the conscript officers. We especially recommend this policy to the Legislature of Virginia; and to the Governor we would venture to prop