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General Hampton's raid around Grant. General Hampton's raid in Grant's rear, and capture of a large number of prisoners and cattle, seems to have been a very handsome affair. He left Petersburg on Wednesday morning with Barringer's, Chambliss's, Rosser's and Dearing's brigades of cavalry, and Graham's and McGregor's batterieGrant's rear, and capture of a large number of prisoners and cattle, seems to have been a very handsome affair. He left Petersburg on Wednesday morning with Barringer's, Chambliss's, Rosser's and Dearing's brigades of cavalry, and Graham's and McGregor's batteries of artillery. Camping at Duval's mills, eighteen miles from the city, in Sussex county, that night, he resumed the march on Thursday morning, passing within three miles of Stony creek, and thence across the Jerusalem plankroad to the Norfolk and Petersburg road. The raid was undertaken to secure a drove of cattle grazing at Cogd. Everything not brought off was destroyed, and we learn much more was destroyed than secured on account of a lack of transportation. The following note to Grant's chief commissary was found in Major Baker's tent: "I have the honor to report the arrival of two thousand four hundred and eighty-six head of cattle here.
ave been received The news is interesting: Movements of Grant and Butler. It will be seem from the following telegrams, which we take from the Baltimore Gazette, that Grant has gone to Washington and Butler to Fortress Monroe: Fortress A later telegram from Fortress Monroe says: Lieutenant-General Grant has just arrived here, on the steamer Metamora, ereyhound. The Gazette makes the following comments on Grant's and Butler's movements: The presence of General GraGeneral Grant in this city yesterday, en route either for Washington or the Upper Potomac, and the return of General Butler to Fortress scarcely undertake any new movements in the absence of General Grant, and although it matters but little, militarily speakinn such occasions. It is useless to conjecture what General Grant's presence in this quarter portends. He keeps his own before Petersburg until the hundred thousand men which General Grant has called for shall have been provided, or whether a c