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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 37 17 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 25 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 20 14 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 18 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Roving Editor: or, Talks with Slaves in the Southern States. 16 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 16 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 15 7 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 15 5 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 15 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 13, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Buchanan or search for Buchanan in all documents.

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ntain nothing more than elaborations of the principles there laid down. It was not wonderful, therefore, that Mr. Calhoun, while he had many admirers, had few friends that could grasp his views. Governor Floyd was one of those few. He adopted the views of Mr. Calhoun because he comprehended them, and they convinced his reason. Governor Floyd had long been under the impression that the Black Republican party was a standing menace to the Union. When he became Secretary of War, under Mr. Buchanan, having better chances of observation than he had ever enjoyed before, he saw that the danger was even greater and more imminent than he had believed it to be. He felt that, unless some means could be discovered of arresting the progress of the Black Republican party, the Union must inevitably be overthrown; for he saw that they were determined to push matters to the last extremity, and to leave the South no room to retreat, or to save so much even as its honor. He was devoted to the Uni