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The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1864., [Electronic resource], Stop the Runaways.--one thousand dollars reward. (search)
t there were no lives loss on the Albemarle, and that there were very few men aboard at the time of the explosion of the torpedo. The War in North Alabama. Since the master of the seat of war from Georgia to North Alabama, the news from both armies comes in more uncertainly and . Almost entirely the extremes northern position of Alabama runs the Charleston and Memphis railroad, its average distance from the line dividing that State from Tennessee being about twenty miles. The Tennessee river runs through Alabama in about the same direction, winding about a little more than the railroad line, and crossing it in several places. When Hood started on his new movement, he kept south of the railroad and river, having the "reserved privilege" of crossing either at any point he found convenient. When Sherman found he could not catch him after his last effort at Lafayette, he turned north and went to Chattanooga, from whence he started on the same line with Hood, except that he is
The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1864., [Electronic resource], Stop the Runaways.--one thousand dollars reward. (search)
ect communication with Atlanta by rail is open and secure, although there are swarms of guerrillas between the Etowah river and Big Shanty. The New York Herald says: Not only is there no foundation for the absurd report, recently set afloat, that General Sherman had abandoned Atlanta, but the place is not considered in any danger whatever. General Sherman has assured the Government that he will hold it in spite of all attempts to dislodge him. The rebels are active along the Tennessee river. A portion of Forrest's command, with three pieces of artillery, is reported to have sunk a steamer and a barge, loaded with army clothing, on that river on last Saturday. A small force of them were attacked by Union cavalry on the same day and driven across the river. Forrest is said to have several thousand men at Jackson, Tennessee. We have no advices yet of the rebels having carried out their design of attacking Paducah, Kentucky. Various bodies of them, though, are prowli