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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

The Daily Dispatch: November 4, 1864., [Electronic resource], Stop the Runaways.--one thousand dollars reward. (search)
the Albemarle. It is understood that there were no lives loss on the Albemarle, and that there were very few men aboard at the time of the explosion of the torpedo. The War in North Alabama. Since the master of the seat of war from Georgia to North Alabama, the news from both armies comes in more uncertainly and . Almost entirely the extremes northern position of Alabama runs the Charleston and Memphis railroad, its average distance from the line dividing that State from Tenness capture these trains, but, thus far, unavailingly. Wheeler is keeping them in check. A raid, however, is anticipated upon the Alabama and Tennessee railroad in the direction of Selma. Some of the Yankee garrisons recently captured in Northern Georgia were raw recruits, in camp of instruction, who had not yet had arms issued to them. From Mobile. In this quarter there is said to be considerable activity, though we are at a loss to know what it could be about, unless it be the ext
d otherwise have been apparent. Thus at the apex of each of the bell-roofed sectional octagon tents are small triplets — a tri-colored of the Confederacy being in the centre, and the English and French flags on either side. At the stall named "Georgia," which is the fourth on the left-hand side, the flag of the ship Georgia is exhibited; and it may be interesting to mention that this same stall is presided over by Mrs. Bullock, the wife of Captain Bullock, of the famous man-of-war. The frontagnificently-gilt clock. "South Carolina," the next stall, is held by the Lady Wharncliffe and Mrs. Pricleau. It contains chiefly small, but richly-wrought, articles of needle-work, scarfs, pictures, and baskets of elegant workmanship. The "Georgia" stall is very finely decorated externally, but the interior is devoted chiefly to baby linen; the only other article worth notice here being a curiously- shared large clock. The ladies presiding are Mrs. Bullock and Mrs. Trapman. "Florida
Letter from Georgia. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] Macon, October 25, 1864. It might not be imprudent to publish, when this reaches you, where the point is towards which General Hood's army is tending; but I will not say now what, probably, even then, should not be, for military reasons, divulged. Important movements are on foot here, which, if successful, will make every Confederate heart leap for joy; but as their success might be jeoparded by their premature announcemlmetto State will be true to her instincts, and will tolerate no doubtful or equivocal language, even in a cherished son, as to the method of attaining the result — solving the great problem. From conversations with several leading gentlemen of Georgia since I entered the State, I derive the assurance that, whatever may float to the surface in the shape of individual opinion or suggestion, even upon the part of distinguished men, the heart of the State is sound to the core; the success of the
Home for Georgia Exiles. --A "Home for Exiles" has been located in Terrell county, Georgia, and is said to be working admirably. The Macon Confederate says: "The State purchased a large tract of land, in the midst of which it is situated; and the location is a most delightful and healthy one. A tent-town has been built up, in imitation of the primitive mode of man. Spacious streets are observed between the rows of tents, and the sidewalks are kept neat and clean. Order, gentility, morality and religion — indeed, all the characteristics of a Quaker settlement — lend their attractions to the place. A rigid system of moral discipline is enforced. No loose or doubtful characters are permitted to remain in the institution.
Marital Rights of slaves. --A Baptist Association of Georgia, at its late session, adopted the following resolution in relation to the marriage relationship between slaves: "Resolved, That it is the firm belief and conviction of this body that the institution of marriage was ordained by Almighty God for the benefit of the whole human race, without respect to color; that it ought to be maintained in its original purity among all classes of people, and in all countries, and in all agehat it is the firm belief and conviction of this body that the institution of marriage was ordained by Almighty God for the benefit of the whole human race, without respect to color; that it ought to be maintained in its original purity among all classes of people, and in all countries, and in all ages, till the end of time; and that, consequently, the law of Georgia, in its failure to recognize and protect this relation between our slaves, is essentially defective, and ought to be amended."