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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,742 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 1,016 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 996 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 516 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 274 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 180 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 164 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 142 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 5, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Alabama (Alabama, United States) or search for Alabama (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

The Conscription in Alabama. We find some interesting statistics in the consolidated return of the registration law of Alabama, just completed under orders of the Conscript Bureau. It appears that there are in that State 14,200 men who are fit for duty who are not in the field. There are, besides these, 4,487 who are physically disabled, and who we leave out of the statistics altogether. Of those who are fit for the field, there are 5,099 exempted by law of Congress, including 1,164 StAlabama, just completed under orders of the Conscript Bureau. It appears that there are in that State 14,200 men who are fit for duty who are not in the field. There are, besides these, 4,487 who are physically disabled, and who we leave out of the statistics altogether. Of those who are fit for the field, there are 5,099 exempted by law of Congress, including 1,164 State officers, 1,315 overseers and agriculturists, 585 ministers, 684 physicians, 291 school teachers, 163 newspaper employees, 445 railroad employees, and a few others. The detailed men in the State number 2,547, and those in Government service 2,794; and in addition to these, there is a list of "miscellaneous" details or exemptions, numbering 971, in which we find that 492 men are put down as "unclassified." The consolidated report, from which this abstract is taken, has some other miscellane
A camp of captured negroes. --A correspondent of the Montgomery Advertiser, in a letter from Blue mountain, Alabama, gives a description of the camp of six hundred and fifty negroes who were captured in Dalton, Georgia. He says: It was nearly sunset when I first got a glimpse of them, huddled around large fires, in a deserted field just outside the limits of the village of Oxford.--There they stood, crouched around the blazing logs, their ebony faces peering out from beneath Yankee caps with that peculiar ludicrous expression which you can imagine would be upon the countenance of a corn-field negro turned soldier. Their long-tailed blue coats and pants, slung on the frames unaccustomed to such gear, gave them the appearance of so many straw-stuffed effigies. As the day began to melt into twilight, and the breeze came sweeping in chilly blasts from the mountain, the darkies crowded closer and closer, until around the burning logs preparations commenced for supper. The c