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22. "Hon. James A. Seddon: "General Early reports that the enemy's cavalry, in considerable force, drove in our cavalry pickets this morning, advanced to Mount Jackson, and crossed the river. It was met by some infantry and one brigade of Rosser's cavalry and driven back, General Rosser pursued, driving the enemy beyond Edinburg in confusion, and compelled him to abandon his killed and wounded. R. E. Lee." Edinburg is on this side of Woodstock, about thirty-six miles from WiGeneral Rosser pursued, driving the enemy beyond Edinburg in confusion, and compelled him to abandon his killed and wounded. R. E. Lee." Edinburg is on this side of Woodstock, about thirty-six miles from Winchester. Mount Jackson is twelve miles from Edinburg, on the Shenandoah river. From Georgia. We are still without official advices from Georgia. Some intelligence, considered good, is said, to have been received at headquarters here on yesterday; but we are unable to form the remotest idea of what it is. It is the general opinion, and we have no doubt a correct one, in well-informed circles, that Sherman took possession of Milledgeville on yesterday. Whether he met with resis
h his three corps all in hand and occupying a fortified line. "Our cavalry had quite a sharp engagement on the 12th, Rosser, with his old brigade and Wickham's, was on our left — Payne, with his brigade, on the pike — and Lomax, with his command, on the right. Rosser's old brigade was whipped; but the fortunes of the day on the left were more than restored by Wickham's brigade and by Payne's, which moved up to Rosser's assistance. Our loss was small. The enemy left between one hundred anRosser's assistance. Our loss was small. The enemy left between one hundred and fifty and two hundred prisoners. Wickham's and Payne's brigades are said to have behaved with great gallantry. It was in this affair, leading a handful of his regiment, that Lieutenant-Colonel Marshall was killed. Colonel Marshall was a son-in-la his command with his third or fourth wound. To all this, she is now driven from her home. May God help her! "When Rosser was hard pressed on the left, the most of Lomax's command was ordered to his support, but he had been relieved before the