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e is not a word direct from Sherman except what the Yankees get from the Richmond papers. General Hood reported threatening Kentucky. The New York Herald has the following about General Hood'sGeneral Hood's movements: We have a reiteration of the statement that the rebel army, under Hood, which for so long a time continued in the vicinity of Florence, Alabama, has moved northward into Tennessee, anHood, which for so long a time continued in the vicinity of Florence, Alabama, has moved northward into Tennessee, and recently occupied Waynesboro', the county town of Wayne county, in that State. Wayne is one of the southern border counties of Tennessee, joining North Alabama, and Waynesboro', is about fifty miles directly north of Florence. Hood is reported to be threatening Nashville, Tennessee, and Paducah, Kentucky, though at Waynesboro' he is far distant from either of those places, both of which are pre fall would be greater were it not for the scary Louisville dispatches announcing the advance of Hood towards Kentucky. Remarkable Plot in New York — all the hotels fired. A great deal of e
From General Hood's army. The Montgomery (Alabama) Mail gives the following account of Hood's crossing the Tennessee river at Florence. It says: "The entire army has crossed the Tennessee river at Florence. Lee's corps crossed first. The other corps crossed on last Sunday. "It is further stated, that while portions of the army were on this side of the river, a party of bold Federal raiders came down the river in skiffs and cut the pontoon bridge in two or three places. ThreeHood's crossing the Tennessee river at Florence. It says: "The entire army has crossed the Tennessee river at Florence. Lee's corps crossed first. The other corps crossed on last Sunday. "It is further stated, that while portions of the army were on this side of the river, a party of bold Federal raiders came down the river in skiffs and cut the pontoon bridge in two or three places. Three of the river raiders were captured, and hatchets were found in their possession, with which they did the cutting. The rest of the party escaped. It was one of the boldest attempts of the Yankee raiders during the campaign. "The bridge was soon repaired, and the remainder of the army crossed. Our informant further states that the baggage and transportation of the army has been materially reduced. One wagon alone is allowed to each headquarters, even including the transportation of the c
ns. There is another theory to account for Sherman's expedition, but not for the slow rate which he prescribes to its movements. It is that the operations of Hood upon his rear rendered it utterly impossible for him to retain his position at Atlanta. That he was compelled to move from that locality and to go somewhere. Thatred the latter. That there is a great deal of truth in this supposition is evident enough. The care which the Yankee newspapers take to represent the movement of Hood as ineffectual and despicable — the ridicule which they cast upon his present position — their constant declaration that Thomas is more than a match for him, and tich we shall very shortly witness. We know nothing of the councils or designs of the authorities; but we cannot help strongly suspecting that this movement of Hood has had the exact effect that it was designed to have, and that this movement of Sherman is a legitimate and calculated consequence.--We express this belief withou