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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 191 93 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 185 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 182 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 156 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 145 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 128 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 106 18 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 103 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 84 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 80 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 16, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) or search for Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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attacked Murfreesboro' and entered the town, shelling it fiercely and destroying many houses. General Roussean, with one regiment of infantry and artillery, drove them out of the town. Four Thousand Confederates Cross the Cumberland river into Kentucky. A telegram from Cairo, dated the 10th instant, says: On the 9th instant, the rebels, under General Lyon, captured the Government transport Thomas E. Tutt, at Cumberland City, on the Cumberland river, twenty miles above Fort Donelson. The Tutt was used for crossing the river. The rebels are on the march into Kentucky. Their force is estimated at four thousand men. The Tutt was loaded with Government forage, and was burned to the water's edge after the rebels had crossed the river. Another telegram says: When last heard from he was moving towards Hopkinsville, Kentucky, and threatening that place. If he attacks that point, the garrison, being small, will be compelled to fall back to a stronger position