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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 26 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1865., [Electronic resource] 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 16, 1863., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Robert Edmund Lee or search for Robert Edmund Lee in all documents.

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of the Bureau of Orders and Detail, Navy Department, in Richmond. He commanded at Drewry's Bluff for a long time. Robert Edmund Lee is at Petersburg — the General Lee of this day. He married Miss Custis, of Arlington, in Alexandria county, thGeneral Lee of this day. He married Miss Custis, of Arlington, in Alexandria county, the daughter and heiress of George Washington Parke Custis, the adopted son of General Washington, who married Mrs. Custis, his mother. General Lee has three sons--Brigadier-General G. W. Custis Lee, aid-decamp to the President (he passed No. 1 aGeneral Lee has three sons--Brigadier-General G. W. Custis Lee, aid-decamp to the President (he passed No. 1 at West Point); Major-General W. H. F. Lee, commanding a division of cavalry in the Army of Northern Virginia, and Robert Edmund Lee, who entered the army, at the instance of his father, as a private in the Rockbridge artillery. He is now on the staRobert Edmund Lee, who entered the army, at the instance of his father, as a private in the Rockbridge artillery. He is now on the staff of General Fitzhugh Lee. Besides these children, General Lee had four daughters — Mary, Anne, Agnes and Mildred — all of them unmarried, and one of whom (Anne) has died died during the war. General W. H. F. Lee married a Miss Wickham, who died a<
he appointment of commissioners to make sale of so much of the stock owned by the State in the joint stock companies as may be necessary to meet any deficiency in the treasury for the expenses incurred, or to be incurred, during the fiscal year; such deficiency to be reported by the Auditor of Public Accounts to the said commissioners. The resolution was adopted. Mr. Cox submitted a resolution looking to the purchase, by the State of Virginia, of the life- size portrait of General Robert E. Lee, now being painted by Mr. Edward C. Bruce, artist, and appointed a committee of five of the House, and three of the Senate to ascertain if the portrait can be purchased; if so, at what price, and to report to the General Assembly. A message was received from the Governor in relation to the distillation of liquor for the use of the Government, and covering a communication on the same subject from the Secretary of War and an opinion of the prohibitory law from the Attorney-General. T
in nearly every paragraph of the most wonderful massacres of rebels on all occasions, and the superhuman valor of our troops, which took place in newspaper correspondence during the first months of the war. General A. J. Smith is accused of taking five thousand prisoners from Forrest in Mississippi, which is fresh news. Two hundred negroes are said to have defended fifteen hundred white troops from the rebels near Colliersville, and saved them. This, too, is perfectly original. General R. E. Lee had a son killed on the Woldon railroad! The bereaved parent should be informed of his loss. He has not heard of it. General Hill, the Gazette says, was killed at the same time. But he still consumes his rations regularly. General Hancock's rush upon the enemy at Spotsylvania, in which he captured Major-General Edward Johnson, of Virginia, and his division, is styled "a splendid charge by General Burnside." Further: "On Wednesday, another action took place, in which Gener