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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 241 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 217 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 208 10 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 169 1 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 158 36 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 81 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 81 1 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 72 20 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 71 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 68 16 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 11, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Hancock or search for Hancock in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 1 document section:

alike from the bounty jumpers and the provost marshals; but His Excellency has no ideas upon the subject. More's the pity! Between the Governor and Major-General Hancock there appears to be some difficulty in reference to recruiting for the First army corps, now being raised by the latter. The Governor is inquisitive aboutn the officers upon the part of Pennsylvania. The fact is, that the Governor has got a twinge of the State rights disorder, and he seems unwilling to forward General Hancock's plans unless the National Government is brought to terms and the authority of Governor Curtin to commission his own favorites, to be officers of picked troos acknowledged. It is not likely that the War Department will humble itself to Governor Curtin, and, therefore, the fact that Pennsylvania will have no troops in Hancock's corps, unless the Legislature should interfere, is becoming very probable. The number of troops sent into service during 1864 from Pennsylvania is 91,704,