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The Daily Dispatch: January 13, 1865., [Electronic resource], The battle of Franklin--an Authentic Description. (search)
son of the lateness of the hour — it now being afternoon — to delay the attack until daylight of the following morning, and then to open with a park of one hundred pieces of artillery, and follow this cannonade with a charge; but the object of General Hood was to defeat the Yankee army before it reached the outskirts of Nashville, and he feared, from its demoralized condition, that it would escape during the night. An attack was, therefore, ordered to be made at once. Stewart and Forrest made ing across the field. It was night, however, and the difficulties of continuing the battle so great, that at 2 o'clock A. M., save the occasional spattering of musketry, the grand chorus of battle was at an end. The next morning it was discovered that the Federal had evacuated the position and were in full retreat to Nashville. It was likewise discovered that Thomas had been largely reinforced, and thus enabled to make the stubborn resistance which had not been anticipated by General Hood.
to the lines yesterday, and were sent North to-day. They were forced to leave on account of the scarcity of food in the district where they had lived, and looked as though they had suffered for the bare necessities of life for some time. General Hood. The Tribune says: It is estimated that Hood took across the Tennessee river from twenty-five thousand to twenty-eight thousand men. General Forrest abandoned about one hundred and fifty wagons on the north side of the river on FridaHood took across the Tennessee river from twenty-five thousand to twenty-eight thousand men. General Forrest abandoned about one hundred and fifty wagons on the north side of the river on Friday. The rebel General Lyon, with eight hundred men, passed through McMinnville capturing a company of Tennessee (Union) cavalry. He then crossed the Chattanooga railroad below Tullahoma, tore up a few of the rails, and then moved on his way to join Forrest at Russellville. Miscellaneous. Gold was quoted in New York on Monday at 226 7 8. Mr. Flint, the Baltimore correspondent of the World, has been released from arrest on parole by General Wallace.