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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 1,463 127 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,378 372 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 810 42 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 606 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 565 25 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 473 17 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 373 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 372 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 277 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 232 78 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 10, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) or search for Atlanta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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ng traveled over a part of the section of the country through which General Sherman passed from Atlanta to Savannah, I thought I would give you a brief account of the effect produced upon it, and alsough which Sherman passed. Indeed, I have heard persons who were living in the neighborhood of Atlanta, and even between Dalton and Atlanta, state they were much surprised at the small extent of injAtlanta, state they were much surprised at the small extent of injury they had sustained at the hands of the enemy. In connection with this statement, and what we daily hear from Savannah, is it not reasonable to suppose that Sherman has inaugurated a new policy —proclamations at various points of the Southwest, his wholesale banishment of the population of Atlanta, and the brilliant illuminations he got up in that city, show that he is one of the most frank motives, to be courteous and humane.--Uncharitable persons may suggest that Sherman's march to Atlanta was a retreat instead of an advance, and that he acted upon the principle of "You let me alone