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Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 118 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 113 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 64 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 52 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 38 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 34 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 24 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 22 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 28, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Dred Scott or search for Dred Scott in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: February 28, 1865., [Electronic resource], Proclamation by the President, appointing a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, with thanksgiving. (search)
a lawyer, and high personal and private character as a man. Mr. Sumner then withdrew his amendment. Mr. Hale (Republican), of New Hampshire, was opposed to the amendment, because the name of Judge Taney would always be associated with Dred Scott, and that of Dred Scott with Judge Taney. Believing this to be the fact, he would not vote for the appropriation of money to perpetuate the memory of the Dred Scott decision. The most that could be asked of the anti slavery men of the presentDred Scott with Judge Taney. Believing this to be the fact, he would not vote for the appropriation of money to perpetuate the memory of the Dred Scott decision. The most that could be asked of the anti slavery men of the present day was that they be permitted to let the memory of Justice Taney rest. Mr. Wilson (Republican), of Massachusetts, said he had no heart to follow any man to the grave; but he felt it his duty to vote against the resolution, and it seemed to him that the millions of this country who were horrified by the Dred Scott decision would be surprised to see the Senate of the United States voting honors to the author of that decision.--The nation was horrified eight years ago when that decision was