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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 222 222 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 56 56 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 56 56 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 34 34 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 30 30 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 30 30 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 24 24 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 22 22 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 19 19 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 15 15 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for 1830 AD or search for 1830 AD in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1865., [Electronic resource], Proclamation by the President, appointing a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, with thanksgiving. (search)
the Devil was hopelessly damned, would have said, 'I am sorry for it.' Never was there a person more destitute than Girard of the qualities which win the affection of others. His temper was violent, his presence for bidding, his usual manner ungracious, his will inflexible, his heart untended, his imagination dead. He was odious to many of his fellow-citizens, who considered him the hardest and meanest of men. He had lived among them for half a century, but he was no more a Philadelphia in 1830 than he was in 1776. He still spoke with a French accent, and accompanied his words with a French shrug and French gesticulation. Surrounded with Christian churches, which he had helped to build, he remained a sturdy unbeliever, and possessed the complete work of only one men — Voltaire. "He made it a point of duty to labor on Sunday, as a good example to others. He made no secret of the fact that he considered the idleness of Sunday an injury to the people, moral and economical.--He