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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 320 320 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 206 206 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 68 68 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 46 46 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 34 34 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 32 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 22 22 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 21 21 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 20 20 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for 1857 AD or search for 1857 AD in all documents.

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e time within which this right was to be exercised. This exclusive right of landing cables on the coasts of Newfoundland and Labrador was transferred in 1856 to the projectors of the Atlantic Telegraph Company upon the condition that it should be exercised before 1862. The Company obtained from the British Government in 1856, as well as from the American Government, a grant of £14,000, conditional upon success, and pledged themselves that the first attempt to lay the cable should be made in 1857. It is believed that the disasters of the company are traceable to this pledge. The cable was hastily constructed in order to be ready in time, and without the aid of carefully-devised experiments. The break machinery was novel and cumbrous. The whole thing was done in a hurry. The United States ship Niagara and the British ship Agamemnon started together with the cable from Valentia on the 7th of August, 1857, with the intention of laying it across to Newfoundland, in accordance with a