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G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 4 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 2, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Balaklava (Ukraine) or search for Balaklava (Ukraine) in all documents.

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in length, was followed by other and more important enterprises. Between 1851 and 1853, lines were laid between England and Ireland, and England and Belgium. In 1853, the Electric and International Telegraph Company laid a submarine telegraph, one hundred and fifty-five miles in length, from Oxfordness to Schevening, in Holland. These lines were all comparatively short and in shallow water, but, in 1855, the requirements of the war in the Crimea led to the construction of a line between Balaklava and Varna, from which may be dated a new era in Ocean Telegraphy. This line was three hundred and ten miles long, and served, to some extent, as a basis for ascertaining the law which governs the retardation of the electric current in long lines of submarine telegraph. Three hundred miles of the cable consisted of a copper wire, covered with gutta percha, entirely unprotected, and ten miles from shore ends had a protecting covering of iron wire. The paying out was effected with great e