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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 110 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 66 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 64 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 60 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 56 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 52 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 50 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 34 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 3, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Red River (Texas, United States) or search for Red River (Texas, United States) in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: March 3, 1865., [Electronic resource], Proclamation by the President, appointing a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, with thanksgiving. (search)
$400.--Persons purchasing arms from the troops will be shot. Deserters can rely upon the same fate. General Boss publishes in the Houston Telegraph the names of eighty of his pickets who have recently deserted, and proclaims them "cowards" and "rascals," and desires them apprehended before reaching Arkansas, supposing them to have gone into the Indian territory on their way home. The rebel army had left Arkansas. On the 22d of December they were at Bog Bayon and Alexandria, on Red river, and at Minturn and Shreveport, Louisiana.--The number bearing arms was about thirty thousand. Shelby was on a raid in Arkansas. They are now well clothed, receiving everything they want from Mexico. Miscellaneous. The New Orleans Times says there is a rumor from Matamoras, by way of Brazos, that the Mexican Government has forbidden clearances for Mexican ports, and the Yankee Consul has been sent out of Matamoras. General Burbridge has been directed to report to General Th
The Daily Dispatch: March 3, 1865., [Electronic resource], Proclamation by the President, appointing a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, with thanksgiving. (search)
ill have an army of about sixteen thousand veterans and six thousand militia--twenty-two thousand in all. It is not necessary to add that we can outnumber him in men and material, and it is possible — it is really probable — that a general engagement of a sanguinary nature may take place in Central or Southern Alabama. Time will settle this speculation. If everything works well, Kirby Smith's army will be attended to before next summer. This will require two expeditions--one up the Red river and one up the Rio Grande. All of the munitions of war, in fact everything but food for this army, is carried up the Rio Grande by European vessels, while Texas and Eastern Louisiana furnish the bread and meat. Kirby Smith has not got a very large army, and can easily be cleaned out when a sufficient force of Federal troops are ready to get to work about the matter right. A correspondent, writing from Eastport, Tennessee, to the Pittsburg Chronicle, says: General Thomas left h