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The Daily Dispatch: March 3, 1865., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 3, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for R. T. Walker or search for R. T. Walker in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: March 3, 1865., [Electronic resource], Proclamation by the President, appointing a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, with thanksgiving. (search)
lphia made wagons arrived by sea in three weeks, mostly for the rebel Government. General Kirby Smith issues permits to all who want to export cotton from Texas for six cents a pound in specie.--The permits can be had at various points in the interior of Texas, or at Shreveport, Louisiana. This has given a new impetus, to the trade, and it is wagoned in some instances, about seven hundred miles. It was selling at Matamoras, January 6, at thirty-five cents per pound, in specie. General Walker was unable to induce his troops to cross the Mississippi to go to Tennessee. He tried it in the middle of December and had to abandon it. His army is made up of Texans, Louisianian, Arkansans and Missourian, the General himself being from Missouri.--They refused to cross the river, some six hundred deserting. He retired to Houston with three thousand men, and took up winter quarters. In the Houston Telegraph of December 25th he issued an order for bidding any more furloughs, and in co
The Daily Dispatch: March 3, 1865., [Electronic resource], Proclamation by the President, appointing a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, with thanksgiving. (search)
ion raged with great fury. On the wharf of the Savannah railroad depot several hundred bales of cotton were awaiting shipment on the blockade-runners; also, several thousand bushels of rough rice. On Lucas street, leading to the depot, was a shed containing twelve hundred bales of cotton, which, together with several other sheds and buildings filled with cotton, belonging to private parties, fell a prey to the flames. Lucas's mill, containing some thirty thousand bushels of rice, and Mr. R. T. Walker's warehouse, at the foot of Broad street, filled with commissary stores, were also destroyed. Shortly after eight o'clock occurred the terrible explosion at the Northeastern railroad. The explosion was tremendous, and shook the whole city. It appears, from all accounts, that this dreadful catastrophe was caused from the careless handling of powder by some boys, taking handfuls and throwing it into the cotton fire at the depot. In doing this they unwittingly laid a train to the a