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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 18 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 16 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 10 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 10 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 10, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Waterloo, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Waterloo, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Waterloo or Austerlitz--General Lee's Plans. The New York Mercury of February 26th has an editorial article which possesses particular interest at this time. We copy it entire: Wilmington is ours. Charleston is ours. Columbia is ours. Without a struggle; without an answering blow. One after the other of these — but lately the chief strongholds of the rebels — have yielded to what the Government organs would have us believe was an inexorable necessity. For nearly four years, bold and impregnable, they have defied attack, laughed siege to scorn, and withstood bombardment, want of supplies, and suffered all the miseries ever endured by a weaker power contending with a stronger. And now why is it, that in this, their last extremity, they have so tamely yielded to the foe they have defied and held at bay so long? Why this sudden departure from the cities which, in the earlier days of the war, they so stoutly swore should never be desecrated by the presence of the "acc