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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 36 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 32 4 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 20 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 28, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Macaulay or search for Macaulay in all documents.

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d virtues, shall be thrown into the shade by the superior homage which is now paid to another and more progressive portion of the British people. We believe that it will be found upon examination that the Cavaliers contributed as much to the literature, the philosophy, the eloquence, the statesmanship, the soldiership, the intellect of England in every department, as any other class of her people. Nor were they the dissolute and reckless race that it has been customary to represent them. Macaulay observes of the Puritans that it is unfair to judge them by the sanctimonious hypocrites and evil men who were found in their number, because power always attracts to its support adventurers and soldiers of fortune, who will embrace any cause and make any profession, political or religious, which will advance their personal success. We claim that the Cavaliers shall be judged by a like charitable standard, and that the same influence of power, which they possessed so much longer than the P