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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.). Search the whole document.

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Bosporus (Turkey) (search for this): card 696
ls of the harbor, you shall reachthe Cimmerian isthmus. This you must leave with stout heart and pass through the channel of Maeotis; and ever after among mankind there shall be great mention of your passing, and it shall be called after you the Bosporus.*Bo/sporos, by popular etymology derived from bou=s and po/ros, “passing of the cow,” is, according to Wecklein, a Thracian form of *fwsfo/ros, “light-bearing,” an epithet of the goddess Hecate. The dialectical form, once misunderstood, was then, it is conjectured, transferred from the Thracian (cp. Aesch. Pers. 746) to the Crimean strait. In theSuppliantsAeschylus makes Io cross the Thracian Bosporus.Then, leaving the soil of Europe,you shall come to the Asian continent. Does it not seem to you that the tyrant of the gods is violent in all his ways? For this god, desirous of union with this mortal maid, has imposed upon her these wanderings. Maiden, you have gained a cruel suitorfor your hand. As to the tale you now have he
quipped with far-darting bows. Do not approach them, but keeping your feet near the rugged shore, where the sea breaks with a roar, pass on beyond their land. On the left hand dwell the workers in iron,the Chalybes, and you must beware of them, since they are savage and are not to be approached by strangers. Then you shall reach the river Hybristes,*(ubristh/s, “Violent” from u(/bris, “violence.” which does not belie its name. Do not cross this, for it is hard to cross, until you come to Caucasus itself,loftiest of mountains, where from its very brows the river pours out its might in fury. You must pass over its crests, which neighbor the stars, and enter upon a southward course, where you shall reach the host of the Amazons, who loathe all men. They shall in time to comeinhabit Themiscyra on the Thermodon, where, fronting the sea, is Salmydessus' rugged jaw, evil host of mariners, step-mother of ships. The Amazons will gladly guide you on your way. Next, just at the narrow por
This you must leave with stout heart and pass through the channel of Maeotis; and ever after among mankind there shall be great mention of your passing, and it shall be called after you the Bosporus.*Bo/sporos, by popular etymology derived from bou=s and po/ros, “passing of the cow,” is, according to Wecklein, a Thracian form of *fwsfo/ros, “light-bearing,” an epithet of the goddess Hecate. The dialectical form, once misunderstood, was then, it is conjectured, transferred from the Thracian (cp. Aesch. Pers. 746) to the Crimean strait. In theSuppliantsAeschylus makes Io cross the Thracian Bosporus.Then, leaving the soil of Europe,you shall come to the Asian continent. Does it not seem to you that the tyrant of the gods is violent in all his ways? For this god, desirous of union with this mortal maid, has imposed upon her these wanderings. Maiden, you have gained a cruel suitorfor your hand. As to the tale you now have heard— understand that it has not even passed the