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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.). Search the whole document.

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Phoenicia (search for this): card 498
Pisthetaerus Formerly also the kite was ruler and king over the Greeks. Leader of the Chorus The Greeks? Pisthetaerus And when he was king, he was the one who first taught them to fall on their knees before the kites. Euelpides By Zeus! that's what I did myself one day on seeing a kite; but at the moment I was on my knees, and leaning backwards with mouth agape, I bolted an obolus and was forced to carry my meal-sack home empty. Pisthetaerus The cuckoo was king of Egypt and of the whole of Phoenicia. When he called out “cuckoo,” all the Phoenicians hurried to the fields to reap their wheat and their barley. Euelpides Hence no doubt the proverb, “Cuckoo! cuckoo! go to the fields, ye circumcised.” Pisthetaerus So powerful were the birds that the kings of Grecian cities, Agamemnon, Menelaus, for instance, carried a bird on the tip of their scepters, who had his share of all presents. Euelpides That I didn't know and was much astonished when I saw Priam come upon the stage in the tragedi
Egypt (Egypt) (search for this): card 498
Pisthetaerus Formerly also the kite was ruler and king over the Greeks. Leader of the Chorus The Greeks? Pisthetaerus And when he was king, he was the one who first taught them to fall on their knees before the kites. Euelpides By Zeus! that's what I did myself one day on seeing a kite; but at the moment I was on my knees, and leaning backwards with mouth agape, I bolted an obolus and was forced to carry my meal-sack home empty. Pisthetaerus The cuckoo was king of Egypt and of the whole of Phoenicia. When he called out “cuckoo,” all the Phoenicians hurried to the fields to reap their wheat and their barley. Euelpides Hence no doubt the proverb, “Cuckoo! cuckoo! go to the fields, ye circumcised.” Pisthetaerus So powerful were the birds that the kings of Grecian cities, Agamemnon, Menelaus, for instance, carried a bird on the tip of their scepters, who had his share of all presents. Euelpides That I didn't know and was much astonished when I saw Priam come upon the stage in the traged