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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Aristophanes, Thesmophoriazusae (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.). Search the whole document.

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a Phaedra. Agathon If the heroes are men, everything in him will be manly. What we don't possess by nature, we must acquire by imitation. Mnesilochus aside When you are staging Satyrs, call me; I will do my best to help you from behind, if I can get my tool up. Agathon Besides, it is bad taste for a poet to be coarse and hairy. Look at the famous Ibycus, at Anacreon of Teos, and at Alcaeus, who handled music so well; they wore head-bands and found pleasure in the lascivious and dances of Ionia. And have you not heard what a dandy Phrynichus was and how careful in his dress? For this reason his pieces were also beautiful, for the works of a poet are copied from himself. Mnesilochus Ah! so it is for this reason that Philocles, who is so hideous, writes hideous pieces; Xenocles, who is malicious, malicious ones, and Theognis, who is cold, such cold ones? Agathon Yes, necessarily and unavoidably; and it is because I knew this that I have so well cared for my person. Mnesilochus How
Mnesilochus aside Then you make love horse-fashion when you are composing a Phaedra. Agathon If the heroes are men, everything in him will be manly. What we don't possess by nature, we must acquire by imitation. Mnesilochus aside When you are staging Satyrs, call me; I will do my best to help you from behind, if I can get my tool up. Agathon Besides, it is bad taste for a poet to be coarse and hairy. Look at the famous Ibycus, at Anacreon of Teos, and at Alcaeus, who handled music so well; they wore head-bands and found pleasure in the lascivious and dances of Ionia. And have you not heard what a dandy Phrynichus was and how careful in his dress? For this reason his pieces were also beautiful, for the works of a poet are copied from himself. Mnesilochus Ah! so it is for this reason that Philocles, who is so hideous, writes hideous pieces; Xenocles, who is malicious, malicious ones, and Theognis, who is cold, such cold ones? Agathon Yes, necessarily and unavoidably; and it is bec