hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Nemea (Greece) 18 0 Browse Search
Olympia (Greece) 14 0 Browse Search
Tiryns (Greece) 8 0 Browse Search
Pytho (Greece) 8 0 Browse Search
Thebes (Greece) 6 0 Browse Search
Athens (Greece) 6 0 Browse Search
Argos (Greece) 6 0 Browse Search
Cirrha (Greece) 6 0 Browse Search
Knossos (Greece) 4 0 Browse Search
Delphi (Greece) 4 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Bacchylides, Dithyrambs (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien). Search the whole document.

Found 9 total hits in 3 results.

Pieria (Greece) (search for this): book Dith, poem 16
Ode 16 (Dithyramb 2) [Heracles (or Deianeira?), for the Delphians] since Ourania on her lovely throne has sent me from Pieria a golden freighter loaded with glorious songs by the flowery Hebrus he takes delight in , or in a long-necked swan delighting his mind you come to seek the flowers of paeans, Pythian Apollo, all those which choruses of Delphians loudly sing at your glorious temple. Meanwhile we sing of how the son of Amphitryon, a bold-minded man, left Oechalia devoured by fire, and arrived at the headland with waves all around it; there he was going to sacrifice from his booty nine loud-bellowing bulls for Cenaean Zeus, lord of the wide-spread clouds, and two for the god who rouses the sea and subdues the earth, and a high-horned unyoked ox for the virgin Athena, whose eyes flash with might. Then a god, useless to fight against, wove for Deianeira, to her great sorrow, a clever scheme, when she heard the bitter news that the son of Zeu
Ode 16 (Dithyramb 2) [Heracles (or Deianeira?), for the Delphians] since Ourania on her lovely throne has sent me from Pieria a golden freighter loaded with glorious songs by the flowery Hebrus he takes delight in , or in a long-necked swan delighting his mind you come to seek the flowers of paeans, Pythian Apollo, all those which choruses of Delphians loudly sing at your glorious temple. Meanwhile we sing of how the son of Amphitryon, a bold-minded man, left Oechalia devoured by fire, and arrived at the headland with waves all around it; there he was going to sacrifice from his booty nine loud-bellowing bulls for Cenaean Zeus, lord of the wide-spread clouds, and two for the god who rouses the sea and subdues the earth, and a high-horned unyoked ox for the virgin Athena, whose eyes flash with might. Then a god, useless to fight against, wove for Deianeira, to her great sorrow, a clever scheme, when she heard the bitter news that the son of Zeus,
Ode 16 (Dithyramb 2) [Heracles (or Deianeira?), for the Delphians] since Ourania on her lovely throne has sent me from Pieria a golden freighter loaded with glorious songs by the flowery Hebrus he takes delight in , or in a long-necked swan delighting his mind you come to seek the flowers of paeans, Pythian Apollo, all those which choruses of Delphians loudly sing at your glorious temple. Meanwhile we sing of how the son of Amphitryon, a bold-minded man, left Oechalia devoured by fire, and arrived at the headland with waves all around it; there he was going to sacrifice from his booty nine loud-bellowing bulls for Cenaean Zeus, lord of the wide-spread clouds, and two for the god who rouses the sea and subdues the earth, and a high-horned unyoked ox for the virgin Athena, whose eyes flash with might. Then a god, useless to fight against, wove for Deianeira, to her great sorrow, a clever scheme, when she heard the bitter news that the son of Zeu