hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Athens (Greece) 90 0 Browse Search
Rhodes (Greece) 74 0 Browse Search
Egypt (Egypt) 50 0 Browse Search
Athens (Greece) 44 0 Browse Search
Athens (Greece) 20 0 Browse Search
Athens (Greece) 10 0 Browse Search
Chersonese (Ukraine) 8 0 Browse Search
Athens (Greece) 8 0 Browse Search
Athens (Greece) 8 0 Browse Search
Cerdon (France) 6 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61.

Found 695 total hits in 193 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
ured by pirate vessels and his goods taken to Argos, while he himself was shot down by an arrow, and met his death. Immediately after this mischance this man Callippus came to the bank, and asked whether they knew Lycon, the Heracleote. Phormion, who is here present, answered that they knew him. “Was he a customer of yours?” “He was,” said Phormion, “but why do you ask?” “Why?” said he, “I will tell you. He is dead, and, as it happens, I am proxenosThe proxenos was sort of consular agent, empowered to act in the interest of his country and his countryman in a foreign state. of the Heracleotes. I demand therefore that you show me your books, that I may know whether he has left any money; for I must of necessity look after the affairs of all the men of Heraclea.”
No sooner had he set out, and was sailing around the Argolic gulf, than his ship was captured by pirate vessels and his goods taken to Argos, while he himself was shot down by an arrow, and met his death. Immediately after this mischance this man Callippus came to the bank, and asked whether they knew Lycon, the Heracleote. Phormion, who is here present, answered that they knew him. “Was he a customer of yours?” “He was,” said Phormion, “but why do you ask?” “Why?” said he, “I will tell you. He is dead, and, as it happens, I am proxenosThe proxenos was sort of consular agent, empowered to act in the interest of his country and his countryman in a foreign state. of the Heracleotes. I demand therefore that you show me your books, that I may know whether he
There is after all, men of Athens, nothing more vexatious than to have a neighbor who is base and covetous; the very thing which has fallen to my lot. For Callicles, having set his heart on my land, has pestered me with malicious and baseless litigation: in the first place he suborned his cousin to claim my property,
le to summary arrest (a)pagwgh/), and the gravity of his assault would have justified a public indictment for criminal outrage (u(/brews grafh/), for either of which crimes he would, if convicted, have suffered a heavy penalty. The private suit for assault and battery (ai)kei/as di/kh) entailed merely a fine to be paid to the plaintiff.; but they urged and advised me not to take upon myself matters which I should not be able to carry, or to appear to be bringing suit for the maltreatment I had received in a manner too ambitious for one so young. I took this course, therefore, and, in deference to their advice, have instituted a private suit, although I should have been very glad, men of Athens, to prosecute the defendant on a capi
You ought, men of Athens, to seek a just course, not only in the light of these considerations, but also in the light of your own previous actions in the case of others who have acted as these men have done. For, when you were worsted in the sea-fight against Alexander,Alexander of Pherae had defeated the Athenian fleet at Peparethus in 361 B.C. you thought that the trierarchs who had let out their trierarchies were chiefly responsible for what had happened, and you gave them over for imprisonment, having decided by show of hands that they had betrayed their ships and deserted their post.
You ought, men of Athens, to seek a just course, not only in the light of these considerations, but also in the light of your own previous actions in the case of others who have acted as these men have done. For, when you were worsted in the sea-fight against Alexander,Alexander of Pherae had defeated the Athenian fleet at Peparethus in 361 B.C. you thought that the trierarchs who had let out their trierarchies were chiefly responsible for what had happened, and you gave them over for imprisonment, having decided by show of hands that they had betrayed their ships and deserted their post.
I shall also bring before you witnesses to prove that Arethusius got the wages on his account from all the persons with whom Cerdon ever worked, and that he used, as being his master, to receive compensation or give it, whenever Cerdon wrought any damage. Witnesses As for Manes: Arethusius lent some money to Archepolis of PeiraeusCerdon wrought any damage. Witnesses As for Manes: Arethusius lent some money to Archepolis of Peiraeus, and when Archepolis was unable to pay either the interest or the principal in full, he made over to him Manes in settlement.To prove that I am speaking the truth, I shall bring before you witnesses to establish these statements. Witnesses
It happened that I was sent as trierarch round the Peloponnesus, and from thence I had to carry to Sicily the ambassadors whom the people had elected. I was forced to set sail in haste, so I wrote to Nicostratus, telling him that I had to put to sea, and that I should not be able to come home for fear of delaying the ambassadors; and I charged him to look after the administration of matters at home, as he had done before.
Peloponnesus (Greece) (search for this): speech 53, section 5
It happened that I was sent as trierarch round the Peloponnesus, and from thence I had to carry to Sicily the ambassadors whom the people had elected. I was forced to set sail in haste, so I wrote to Nicostratus, telling him that I had to put to sea, and that I should not be able to come home for fear of delaying the ambassadors; and I charged him to look after the administration of matters at home, as he had done before.
I answered, however, in the presence of witnesses, that I was ready to go with them to the senate, and in conjunction with the senate or the ElevenThe board of police commissioners at Athens. to receive the slaves for the torture, telling them that, if my suit against them had been a private one, I should have accepted the slaves for the torture, if they had offered them, but that, as it was, both the slaves and the information belonged to the stateSince Arethusius was a state-debtor.; and therefore the examination by the torture should be conducted by a public official.
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...