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Dinarchus, Speeches 8 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Adelphi: The Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 8 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 8 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 8 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 8 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 8 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 6 0 Browse Search
Hyperides, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
Isaeus, Speeches 6 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 6 0 Browse Search
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Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XIII, Chapter 73 (search)
d his hoplites from Mitylene, and drawing up his army before the city he challenged the Cymaeans to battle; but when no one came out of the city, he ravaged its territory and sailed off to Mitylene. The Cymaeans dispatched an embassy to Athens and denounced Alcibiades for having laid waste an allied city which had done no wrong; and there were also many other charges brought against him; for some of the soldiers at Samos, who were at odds with him, sailed to Athens and atched an embassy to Athens and denounced Alcibiades for having laid waste an allied city which had done no wrong; and there were also many other charges brought against him; for some of the soldiers at Samos, who were at odds with him, sailed to Athens and accused Alcibiades in the Assembly of favouring the Lacedaemonian cause and of forming ties of friendship with Pharnabazus whereby he hoped that at the conclusion of the war he should lord it over his fellow citizens.
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XIII, Chapter 74 (search)
the fleet from Alcibiades. After Alcibiades had relinquished his command to Conon and handed over his armaments, he gave up any thought of returning to Athens, but with one trireme withdrew to PactyeAlcibiades had acquired castles here and at Bisanthe against some such contingency as this. in Thrace, sild inflict punishment upon him for all the wrongs he had committed against them. Consequently he himself condemned himself to exile."Feared and distrusted in Athens, Sparta, and Persia alike, the most brilliant man of action of his generation, whose judgment of public policies was as unerring as his personal aims, metho as unerring as his personal aims, methods, and conduct were wrong, found outlet for his restless energy only in waging private war on the 'kingless' Thracians. Had Athens been able to trust him he might have saved her Empire and destroyed her liberty." (W.S. Ferguson in Camb. Anc. Hist. 5, p. 354.).
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XIII, Chapter 80 (search)
ecause of his age, they appointed besides him another general, Himilcon, the son of Hanno and of the same family.A recently discovered inscription from Athens, a decree of the Council mentioning Hannibal and Himilcon, has been published by B. D. Meritt, "Athens and Carthage," Harvard Studies in Classical PhilologyAthens and Carthage," Harvard Studies in Classical Philology, Supplementary Volume I (1940), pp. 247-253. Although the inscription is most fragmentary, it would appear that heralds from Carthage had come to Athens in connection with this invasion, and it is certain that the Athenians had sent a mission to confer with Hannibal and Himilcon in Sicily. These two, Athens in connection with this invasion, and it is certain that the Athenians had sent a mission to confer with Hannibal and Himilcon in Sicily. These two, after full consultation, dispatched certain citizens who were held in high esteem among the Carthaginians with large sums of money, some to Iberia and others to the Baliarides Islands, with orders to recruit as many mercenaries as possible. And they themselves canvassed Libya, enrolling as soldiers Libyans and Phoe
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