hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 32 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 32 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 30 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 30 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 30 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 28 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 28 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 26 0 Browse Search
Plato, Letters 26 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 26 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Diodorus Siculus, Library. You can also browse the collection for Athens (Greece) or search for Athens (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 178 results in 113 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Chapter 91 (search)
451 B.C.When Antidotus was archon in Athens, the Romans elected as consuls Lucius Postumius and Marcus Horatius. During this year Ducetius, who held the leadership of the Siceli, seized the city of Aetna, having treacherously slain its leader, and then he moved with an army into the territory of the Acragantini and laid siege to Motyum, which was held by a garrison of Acragantini; and when the Acragantini and the Syracusans came to the aid of the city, he joined battle with them, was successful, and drove them both out of their camps. But since at the time winter was setting in, they separated and returned to their homes; and the Syracusans found their general Bolcon, who was responsible for the defeat and was thought to have had secret dealings with Ducetius, guilty of treason and put him to death. With the beginning of summer they appointed a new general, to whom they assigned a strong army with orders to subdue Ducetius. This general,
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Contents of the Twelfth Book of Diodorus (search)
chaps. 31-33). —The revolt of Potidaea and the Chalcidians from the Athenians (chap. 34). —On the campaign of the Athenians against the Potidaeans (chap. 34). —On the civil strife which arose in Thurii (chap. 35). —How Meton of Athens was the first to expound the nineteen-year cycle (chap. 36). —How the Tarantini founded the city of Heracleia in Italy (chap. 36). —How in Rome Spurius Maelius attempted to seize the supreme power and was put to death (chap. 37). —On the Lacedaemonians against Acarnania and the naval battle with the Athenians (chaps. 47-48). —The campaign of Sitalces against Macedonia, and of the Lacedaemonians against Attica (chaps. 50-51). —On the embassy from Leontini to Athens and the powerful oratory of Gorgias their ambassador (chap. 53). —On the war between the Leontines and the Syracusans (chap. 54). —The revolt of the Lesbians from the Athenians and the seizure and destruction of P
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 3 (search)
450 B.C.When EuthydemusEuthynus I.A. 4.1.22a. was archon at Athens, the Romans elected as consuls Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and Marcus Fabius Vibulanus. In this year the Athenians, who had been at war with the Persians on behalf of the Egyptians and had lost all their ships at the island which is known as Prosopitis,Cp. Book 11.77. after a short time resolved to make war again upon the Persians on behalf of the Greeks in Asia Minor. And fitting out a fleet of two hundred triremes, they chose Cimon, the son of Miltiades, to be general and commanded him to sail to Cyprus to make war on the Persians. And Cimon, taking the fleet which had been furnished with excellent crews and abundant supplies, sailed to Cyprus. At that time the generals of the Persian armaments were Artabazus and Megabyzus. Artabazus held the supreme commandProbably only of the fleet. and was tarrying in Cyprus with three hundred triremes, and Megabyzus
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 4 (search)
449 B.C.When Pedieus was archon in Athens, the Romans elected as consuls Marcus Valerius Lactuca and Spurius Verginius Tricostus. In this year Cimon, the general of the Athenians, being master of the sea, subdued the cities of Cyprus. And since a large Persian garrison was there in Salamis and the city was fill the satraps the written terms on which they were permitted to come to a settlement with the Greeks. Consequently Artabazus and Megabyzus sent ambassadors to Athens to discuss a settlement. The Athenians were favourable and dispatched ambassadors plenipotentiary, the leader of whom was Callias the son of Hipponicus; and enerals, the Athenians are not to send troops into the territory over which the king is ruler.There was a cessation of hostilities at this time between Athens and Persia; but the specific terms of the treaty, as they are stated here and in fourth-century orators, are clearly false. See Walker in Camb. Anc.
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 5 (search)
448 B.C.When Philiscus was archon in Athens, the Romans elected as consuls Titus Romilius Vaticanus and Gaius Veturius Cichorius; and the Eleians celebrated the Eighty-third Olympiad, that in which Crison of Himera won the "stadion." In this year the Megarians revolted from the Athenians, and dispatching ambassadors to the Lacedaemonians they concluded an alliance with them. Irritated at this the Athenians sent soldiers into the territory of the Megarians, plundering their properties and seizing much booty. And when the Megarians issued from their city to defend their territory, a battle ensued in which the Athenians were victorious and chased them back within their walls.
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 6 (search)
447 B.C.When Timarchides was archon in Athens, the Romans elected as consuls Spurius Tarpeius and Aulus Asterius Fontinius.This is probably a corruption of Fontinalis. In this year the Lacedaemonians invaded Attica and ravaged a large part of the countryside, and after laying siege to some of the Athenian fortresses they withdrew to the Peloponnesus; and Tolmides, the Athenian general, seized Chaeroneia. And when the Boeotians gathered their forces and caught Tolmides' troops in an ambush, a violent battle took place at Coroneia, in the course of which Tolmides fell fighting and of the remaining Athenians some were massacred and others were taken alive. The result of a disaster of such magnitude was that the Athenians were compelled to allow all the cities throughout Boeotia to live under laws of their own making,The Athenians had established democracies in most of the cities of Boeotia and the oligarchs had consequently withdrawn fr
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 7 (search)
446 B.C.When Callimachus was archon in Athens, the Romans elected as consuls Sextus Quinctius . . . Trigeminus. In this year, since the Athenians had been weakened in Greece because of their defeat in Boeotia at Coroneia, many cities revolted from them. Since the inhabitants of Euboea were taking the lead in the revolution, Pericles, who had been chosen general, made a campaign against Euboea with a strong force, and taking the city of Hestiaea by storm he removed the inhabievolted from them. Since the inhabitants of Euboea were taking the lead in the revolution, Pericles, who had been chosen general, made a campaign against Euboea with a strong force, and taking the city of Hestiaea by storm he removed the inhabitants from their native city; and the other cities he terrified and forced back into obedience to the Athenians.A truceBetween Athens and Sparta. was made for thirty years, Callias and Chares negotiating and confirming the peace.
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 22 (search)
445 B.C.When Lysimachides was archon in Athens, the Romans elected as consuls Titus Menenius and Publius Sestius Capitolinus. In this year the Sybarites who were fleeing from the danger threatening them in the civil strife made their home on the Trais River. Here they remained for a time, but later they were driven out by the Brettii and destroyed. And in Greece the Athenians, regaining control of Euboea and driving the Hestiaeans from their city, dispatched, under Pericles as commander, a colony of their own citizens to it and sending forth a thousand colonists they portioned out both the city and countryside in allotments.
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 23 (search)
444 B.C.When Praxiteles was archon in Athens, the Eighty-fourth Olympiad was celebrated, that in which Crison of Himera won the "stadion," and in Rome the following ten menThe famous Decemvirate. were elected to draft laws: Publius Clodius Regillanus, Titus Minucius, Spurius Veturius, Gaius Julius, Gaius Sulpicius, Publius Sestius, Romulus (Romilius), Spurius Postumius Calvinius.The sources do not agree on the names. Here Publius Clodius should be Appius Claudius; and Diodorus also omits the names of A. Manlius Vulso and P. Curiatius. These men drew up the laws.The Laws of the Twelve Tables, the first Roman laws to be put in writing. The common Roman tradition was that two of the laws were passed under the second Decemvirate; but Diodorus (chap. 26.1) states that they were added under the consuls Horatius and Valerius, and this seems more likely (see Beloch, Römische Geschichte, p. 245). The correct dates of the Decemvirates
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 24 (search)
443 B.C.When Lysanias was archon in Athens, the Romans again chose ten men as lawmakers: Appius Clodius, Marcus Cornelius, Lucius Minucius, Gaius Sergius, Quintus Publius, Manius Rabuleius, and Spurius Veturius.These are only seven names, and the last, Spurius Veturius, is not found in other lists; Clodius should be Claudius. These men, however, were not able to complete the codification of the laws. OneAppius Claudius (Livy 3 44). of them had conceived a passion for a maiden who was penniless but of good family, and at first he tried to seduce the girlVerginia. The following story ranks among the most famous of Roman tradition. The classic account is in Livy 3.44 ff. by means of money; and when she would have nothing to do with him, he sent an agent to her home with orders to lead her into slavery. The agent, claiming that she was his own slave, brought her, serving in that capacity, before the magistrate, in whose court
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...