hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Athens (Greece) 356 0 Browse Search
Sicily (Italy) 224 0 Browse Search
Greece (Greece) 134 0 Browse Search
Syracuse (Italy) 124 0 Browse Search
Peloponnesus (Greece) 96 0 Browse Search
Italy (Italy) 90 0 Browse Search
Attica (Greece) 88 0 Browse Search
Asia 84 0 Browse Search
Agrigentum (Italy) 74 0 Browse Search
Boeotia (Greece) 70 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Diodorus Siculus, Library. Search the whole document.

Found 7 total hits in 3 results.

At once, then, Aristeides advised all the allies as they were holding a general assembly to designate the island of DelosThat is, the temple of Apollo on that island. as their common treasury and to deposit there all the money they collected, and towards the war which they suspected would come from the Persians to impose a levy upon all the cities according to their means, so that the entire sum collected would amount to five hundred and sixty talents.According to Thuc. 1.96.2 and Plut. Arist. 24.3 and Plut. Arist. 24.3 the first assessment amounted to four hundred and sixty talents. The latest and fullest treatment of this subject is B. D. Meritt, H. T. Wade-Gery, M.F. McGregor, The Athenian Tribute Lists, Vol. 1 (1939). And when he was appointed to allocate the levy, he distributed the sum so accurately and justly that all the cities consented to it. Consequently, since he was considered to have accomplished an
nt to five hundred and sixty talents.According to Thuc. 1.96.2 and Plut. Arist. 24.3 and Plut. Arist. 24.3 the first assessment amounted to four hundred and sixty talents. The latest and fullest treatment of this subject is B. D. Meritt, H. T. Wade-Gery, M.F. McGregor, The Athenian Tribute Lists, Vol. 1 (1939). And when he was appointed to allocate the levy, he distributed the sum so accurately and justly that all the cities consented to it. Consequently, since he was considered to have accomplished an impossible thing, he won for himself a very high reputation for justice, and because he excelled in that virtue he was given the epithet of "the Just." Thus at one and the same time the baseness of Pausanias deprived his countrymen of the supremacy on the sea, and the all-round virtue of Aristeides caused Athens to gain the leadership which she had not possessed before.These, then, were the events of this year.
they suspected would come from the Persians to impose a levy upon all the cities according to their means, so that the entire sum collected would amount to five hundred and sixty talents.According to Thuc. 1.96.2 and Plut. Arist. 24.3 and Plut. Arist. 24.3 the first assessment amounted to four hundred and sixty talents. The latest and fullest treatment of this subject is B. D. Meritt, H. T. Wade-Gery, M.F. McGregor, The Athenian Tribute Lists, Vol. 1 (1939). And when he was appointed to allocate the levy, he distributed the sum so accurately and justly that all the cities consented to it. Consequently, since he was considered to have accomplished an impossible thing, he won for himself a very high reputation for justice, and because he excelled in that virtue he was given the epithet of "the Just." Thus at one and the same time the baseness of Pausanias deprived his countrymen of the supremacy on the sea, and the a