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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs).

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set you free from mortal woe and make you a god, deathless and exempt from decay. And then you shall dwell with me in the house of Nereus, god with goddess, for all time to come. From there, walking dry-shod out of the deep you will see your beloved son and mine, Achilles, dwelling in his island home on the strand of Leuke in the Sea Inhospitable.A tradition going back to the epic poet Arctinus said that Achilles' ghost haunted the island of Leuke, opposite the mouth of the Danube in the Euxine Sea. But go to the god-built city of Delphi with the body of this man, and when you have buried him in earth, go to the hollow cave on the ancient promontory of Sepias and sit. Wait there until I come from the sea with a chorus of fifty Nereids to escort you. You must carry out the course that fate prescribes, for this is the will of Zeus. Cease from your grieving for the dead. For this is the judgement that stands over all mortals and death is their debt to pay.Exit Thetis by the mechane.
to me, I shall set you free from mortal woe and make you a god, deathless and exempt from decay. And then you shall dwell with me in the house of Nereus, god with goddess, for all time to come. From there, walking dry-shod out of the deep you will see your beloved son and mine, Achilles, dwelling in his island home on the strand of Leuke in the Sea Inhospitable.A tradition going back to the epic poet Arctinus said that Achilles' ghost haunted the island of Leuke, opposite the mouth of the Danube in the Euxine Sea. But go to the god-built city of Delphi with the body of this man, and when you have buried him in earth, go to the hollow cave on the ancient promontory of Sepias and sit. Wait there until I come from the sea with a chorus of fifty Nereids to escort you. You must carry out the course that fate prescribes, for this is the will of Zeus. Cease from your grieving for the dead. For this is the judgement that stands over all mortals and death is their debt to pay.Exit Thetis b
Parnassus (Greece) (search for this): card 1085
man, who makes his way through the god's gold-laden precincts and the treasuries given by mortals? He has come here a second time for the same purpose as his earlier visit and means to sack the temple of Phoebus.’ Thereafter tumult ran through the city. The authorities flocked into the council-chamber, and of their own accord those who had charge of the god's property posted a watch in the porticoed halls. We, knowing as yet nothing of these things, took sheep, nurslings of the grass of Parnassus, and going on our way stood next to the altars together with Delphian diviners and those charged with looking after foreigners. Someone said, ‘Young man, what shall we ask from the god on your behalf? Why have you come here?’ And he replied, ‘I wish to give satisfaction to Phoebus for my earlier sin. For I demanded once that the god pay the penalty for my father's death.’ At that point it was clear that Orestes' story was having a great effect, the story that my master was lying and h
Pytho (Greece) (search for this): card 26
Zeus be my witness that it was against my will that I became sharer in this bed! But I cannot persuade her of this, and she wants to kill me. Menelaus her father is acting as his daughter's accomplice in this, and he is now in the house, having come from Sparta for this very purpose. In fear I have come and taken my seat at this shrine of Thetis near the house on the chance that it may save me from death. For Peleus and Peleus' offspring honor it as a monument to their marriage-tie with a Nereid. My only child have I sent secretly to another house, for fear that he may be killed. For his father is not beside me to protect me, and for his son he does not exist, since he is away in the land of Delphi. There he is offering amends to Apollo for his madness—in which he went to Pytho and asked Phoebus for satisfaction for his father Achilles, whom the god had killed—on the chance that by begging remission of punishment for his previous sins he might win the god's favor for the futur
Paris (France) (search for this): card 103
Andromache sung It was not as a bride that Paris brought Helen to lofty Troy into his chamber to lie with but rather as mad ruin. For her sake, the sharp warcraft of Greece in its thousand ships captured you, O Troy, sacked you with fire and sword, and killed Hector, husband to luckless me. The son of the sea-goddess Thetis dragged him, as he rode his chariot, about the walls of Troy. I myself was led off from my chamber to the sea-shore, putting hateful slavery as a covering about my head. Many were the tears that rolled down my cheeks when I left my city and my home and my husband lying in the dust. Oh, unhappy me, why should I still look on the light as Hermione's slave? Oppressed by her I have come as suppliant to this statue of the goddess and cast my arms about it, and I melt in tears like some gushing spring high up on a cliff.
Paris (France) (search for this): card 693
man among countless others and did no more than a single warrior, yet he gets more credit. [And sitting high and mighty in office in the city they think grander thoughts than the commons though they are worthless. The people are far superior to them in wisdom if they acquired at once daring and will.] It is in this fashion that you and your brother sit puffed up over Troy and your generalship there, made high and mighty by the toils and labors of others. But I will teach you not to regard Paris, shepherd of Mount Ida, a greater enemy to you than Peleus unless you clear off from this house at once, you and your childless daughter. This child, offspring of my loins, shall drive her through this house, grasping her by the hair, if she, sterile heifer that she is, does not put up with others' having children just because she herself has none. If her luck in respect to children is bad, must we be bereft of offspring? Clear away from this woman, slaves, so that I may learn whether anyo
Thrace (Greece) (search for this): card 183
too is a means of procuring love. It is not beauty but good qualities that give joy to husbands. But if you get angry, then Sparta is a great city while Scyros, you maintain, is nowhere, you are a rich woman living in the midst of the poor, and Menelaus, you claim, is a greater man than Achilles. It is for this that your husband hates you. A woman, even if given in marriage to a lowly husband, must respect him and not engage in a contest of pride. If you had had as husband a king in snowy Thrace, where one husband divides his bed in turn among many women, would you have killed them? If so you would have clearly branded all women with the charge of sexual insatiability. This is a shameful thing. And yet though we women suffer worse from this disease than men do, at least let us veil it decently from sight. Dearest Hector, I even went so far as to help you in your amours, if Aphrodite ever made you fall, and I often gave the breast to your bastards in order that I might show you no
Thessaly (Greece) (search for this): card 1
s children. In days gone by I was a woman to be envied, but now I am, if any woman ever was, the paragon of misery. I saw my husband Hector killed by the hand of Achilles and I beheld Astyanax, the son I bore my husband, hurled from the high battlements once the Greeks had captured the land of Troy. I myself, a member of a house most free, became a slave and was brought to Greece, given as the choicest of the Trojan spoil to the islander Neoptolemus as his prize of war. I live now in the lands that border on Phthia here and the city of Pharsalia, lands where the sea-goddess Thetis, far from the haunts of men and fleeing their company, dwelt as wife with Peleus. The people of Thessaly call it Thetideion in honor of the goddess's marriage. Here is where Achilles' son made his home, and he lets Peleus rule over the land of Pharsalia, being unwilling to take the sceptre during the old man's lifetime. In this house I have given birth to a manchild, lying with Achilles' son, my master.
Thessaly (Greece) (search for this): card 1173
Peleus Ah me, what disaster is this I see and take in my hands into my house! Oh, alas! City of Thessaly, I am undone, I am perished, none of my race, no children, are left for me in my house! Oh how wretched misfortune has made me! To what friend shall I look for consolation? O face that I love and knees and hands, would that the god had killed you beneath Troy's walls by the bank of the Simois!
Argive (Greece) (search for this): card 384
rather than him, the man who is to blame? Will you let go the cause and attack the effect that came after? Alas for my misery! O my unhappy fatherland, what injustice I suffer! Why must I even have given birth and doubled the burden I bear? [But why do I lament these things but do not consider to their last drop the misfortunes immediately before me?] I saw Hector dragged to death behind a chariot and Troy put piteously to the torch, and I myself went, pulled by the hair, as a slave to the Argive ships. And when I came to Phthia, I was made the bride of Hector's slayer. How can life be sweet for me? To what shall I look? To my past or my present fate? I had left a single son, the eye of my life: those who have decided these things mean to kill him. But no, not to save my wretched life! If he survives he bears our hopes, while for me not to die on behalf of my child is a reproach. She leaves the altar and puts her arms about Molossus. There, I leave the altar and am in your hands, t
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