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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs).

Found 290 total hits in 77 results.

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Thessaly (Greece) (search for this): card 1
s children. In days gone by I was a woman to be envied, but now I am, if any woman ever was, the paragon of misery. I saw my husband Hector killed by the hand of Achilles and I beheld Astyanax, the son I bore my husband, hurled from the high battlements once the Greeks had captured the land of Troy. I myself, a member of a house most free, became a slave and was brought to Greece, given as the choicest of the Trojan spoil to the islander Neoptolemus as his prize of war. I live now in the lands that border on Phthia here and the city of Pharsalia, lands where the sea-goddess Thetis, far from the haunts of men and fleeing their company, dwelt as wife with Peleus. The people of Thessaly call it Thetideion in honor of the goddess's marriage. Here is where Achilles' son made his home, and he lets Peleus rule over the land of Pharsalia, being unwilling to take the sceptre during the old man's lifetime. In this house I have given birth to a manchild, lying with Achilles' son, my master.
Enter Andromache from the house. She takes her place as a suppliant before the altar of Thetis in the orchestra. Andromache Glory of Asia, city of Thebe! It was from you that I, Andromache, once came dowered with golden luxury to the royal house of Priam, given to Hector as lawful wife for the bearing of his children. In days gone by I was a woman to be envied, but now I am, if any woman ever was, the paragon of misery. I saw my husband Hector killed by the hand of Achilles and I beheld Astyanax, the son I bore my husband, hurled from the high battlements once the Greeks had captured the land of Troy. I myself, a member of a house most free, became a slave and was brought to Greece, given as the choicest of the Trojan spoil to the islander Neoptolemus as his prize of war. I live now in the lands that border on Phthia here and the city of Pharsalia, lands where the sea-goddess Thetis, far from the haunts of men and fleeing their company, dwelt as wife with Peleus. The people of The
Greece (Greece) (search for this): card 1
once came dowered with golden luxury to the royal house of Priam, given to Hector as lawful wife for the bearing of his children. In days gone by I was a woman to be envied, but now I am, if any woman ever was, the paragon of misery. I saw my husband Hector killed by the hand of Achilles and I beheld Astyanax, the son I bore my husband, hurled from the high battlements once the Greeks had captured the land of Troy. I myself, a member of a house most free, became a slave and was brought to Greece, given as the choicest of the Trojan spoil to the islander Neoptolemus as his prize of war. I live now in the lands that border on Phthia here and the city of Pharsalia, lands where the sea-goddess Thetis, far from the haunts of men and fleeing their company, dwelt as wife with Peleus. The people of Thessaly call it Thetideion in honor of the goddess's marriage. Here is where Achilles' son made his home, and he lets Peleus rule over the land of Pharsalia, being unwilling to take the sceptr
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 1009
Chorus O Phoebus, who built high the fair-walled rock of Troy, and you, Lord of the Deep, who ride your chariot with horses the color of the sea over the salt main, why did you deprive your hand of its cunning craftsmanship, and put it at the service of Ares, Lord of the Spear, and thereby let slip luckless, luckless Troy? Chorus O Phoebus, who built high the fair-walled rock of Troy, and you, Lord of the Deep, who ride your chariot with horses the color of the sea over the salt main, why did you deprive your hand of its cunning craftsmanship, and put it at the service of Ares, Lord of the Spear, and thereby let slip luckless, luckless Troy?
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 1019
Chorus Many were the chariots with lovely horses that you caused to be yoked by the banks of the Simois, many the deadly contests of men, with no garlands for the victor, that you established. Perished and gone are the kings descended from Ilus, and no more does the fire gleam on the altars of the gods in Troy or its smoke of incense arise.
Argos (Greece) (search for this): card 1028
Chorus Perished is Atreus' son by the hand of his wife, and she in her turn received death, in exchange for his murder, at the hands of her children. But now the god's oracular commandment has returned when the son of Agamemnon, come from Argos and standing in the god's inmost shrine, won him as an ally, his mother's blood on his hands. O god, o Phoebus, how can I believe it?
Paris (France) (search for this): card 103
Andromache sung It was not as a bride that Paris brought Helen to lofty Troy into his chamber to lie with but rather as mad ruin. For her sake, the sharp warcraft of Greece in its thousand ships captured you, O Troy, sacked you with fire and sword, and killed Hector, husband to luckless me. The son of the sea-goddess Thetis dragged him, as he rode his chariot, about the walls of Troy. I myself was led off from my chamber to the sea-shore, putting hateful slavery as a covering about my head. Many were the tears that rolled down my cheeks when I left my city and my home and my husband lying in the dust. Oh, unhappy me, why should I still look on the light as Hermione's slave? Oppressed by her I have come as suppliant to this statue of the goddess and cast my arms about it, and I melt in tears like some gushing spring high up on a cliff.
Hermione (Greece) (search for this): card 103
Andromache sung It was not as a bride that Paris brought Helen to lofty Troy into his chamber to lie with but rather as mad ruin. For her sake, the sharp warcraft of Greece in its thousand ships captured you, O Troy, sacked you with fire and sword, and killed Hector, husband to luckless me. The son of the sea-goddess Thetis dragged him, as he rode his chariot, about the walls of Troy. I myself was led off from my chamber to the sea-shore, putting hateful slavery as a covering about my head. Many were the tears that rolled down my cheeks when I left my city and my home and my husband lying in the dust. Oh, unhappy me, why should I still look on the light as Hermione's slave? Oppressed by her I have come as suppliant to this statue of the goddess and cast my arms about it, and I melt in tears like some gushing spring high up on a cliff.
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 103
Andromache sung It was not as a bride that Paris brought Helen to lofty Troy into his chamber to lie with but rather as mad ruin. For her sake, the sharp warcraft of Greece in its thousand ships captured you, O Troy, sacked you with fire and sword, and killed Hector, husband to luckless me. The son of the sea-goddess Thetis draTroy, sacked you with fire and sword, and killed Hector, husband to luckless me. The son of the sea-goddess Thetis dragged him, as he rode his chariot, about the walls of Troy. I myself was led off from my chamber to the sea-shore, putting hateful slavery as a covering about my head. Many were the tears that rolled down my cheeks when I left my city and my home and my husband lying in the dust. Oh, unhappy me, why should I still look on the lighTroy. I myself was led off from my chamber to the sea-shore, putting hateful slavery as a covering about my head. Many were the tears that rolled down my cheeks when I left my city and my home and my husband lying in the dust. Oh, unhappy me, why should I still look on the light as Hermione's slave? Oppressed by her I have come as suppliant to this statue of the goddess and cast my arms about it, and I melt in tears like some gushing spring high up on a cliff.
Greece (Greece) (search for this): card 103
Andromache sung It was not as a bride that Paris brought Helen to lofty Troy into his chamber to lie with but rather as mad ruin. For her sake, the sharp warcraft of Greece in its thousand ships captured you, O Troy, sacked you with fire and sword, and killed Hector, husband to luckless me. The son of the sea-goddess Thetis dragged him, as he rode his chariot, about the walls of Troy. I myself was led off from my chamber to the sea-shore, putting hateful slavery as a covering about my head. Many were the tears that rolled down my cheeks when I left my city and my home and my husband lying in the dust. Oh, unhappy me, why should I still look on the light as Hermione's slave? Oppressed by her I have come as suppliant to this statue of the goddess and cast my arms about it, and I melt in tears like some gushing spring high up on a cliff.
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