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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs).

Found 290 total hits in 77 results.

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Andromache sung Here am I, hands bloodied with the tight bonds about them, being sent down to death. Boy sung Mother, o mother, under your wing I go down as well. Andromache sung This is a cruel sacrifice, o rulers of Phthia! Boy sung Father, come and help those you love. Andromache sung Dear child, you will lie below dead with your dead mother, next to her breast. Boy sung Oh me! What will become of me? Unhappy are we, you and I, mother.
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 537
Menelaus Why do you fall before me, why entreat me when I am like a cliff or a wave of the sea? I help my kin, but I have no cause to love you since I expended a great part of my soul in capturing Troy and with it your mother. It is the benefit you derive from her that you now go down to the Underworld.
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 545
l, guiltless though he is, along with his unhappy mother. But I entreat you, old sir, falling before your knees—for I cannot touch your beloved chin with my hand— save me, in the gods' name. Otherwise I shall die, sir, with disgrace to you and misery for me. Peleus I order you to loosen her bonds, before someone smarts for it, and to release this woman's two hands. Menelaus But I forbid it, and I am in other ways not inferior to you and have much more authority over her. Peleus What? Will you come here and manage my household? Is it not enough to control affairs in Sparta? Menelaus It was I who took her captive from Troy. Peleus But my grandson received her as his prize of valor. Menelaus Are not my goods all his and his all mine? Peleus Yes, to treat well, not ill, not to kill by the sword. Menelaus Never, be sure, will you take her from my hand. Peleus But I shall, when I have bloodied your head with this sceptre. Menelaus You'll find out if you come closer and touch
Delphi (Greece) (search for this): card 56
ow, in their desire to kill me, woman most wretched? Servant They are about to kill your son, unhappy woman, whom you sent secretly out of the house. Menelaus has left the house to fetch him. Andromache Oh me! Has he discovered the son I sent into hiding? How could he have done so? Alas, I am undone! Servant I do not know. But I had this word from them. Andromache Then I am undone. O my son, these two vultures will take you and kill you, and the man who is called your father tarries in Delphi. Servant I think that you would not be in such sorry plight if he were present. But as it is you are bereft of friends. Andromache Is there also no word of Peleus' coming? Servant He is too old to help you were he here. Andromache And yet I sent a message more than once. Servant Do you suppose any of your messengers cared about you? Andromache Of course not! Will you then be messenger? Servant What shall I say being so long from home? Andromache You will find many dodges: you are a
Hermione (Greece) (search for this): card 56
not be in such sorry plight if he were present. But as it is you are bereft of friends. Andromache Is there also no word of Peleus' coming? Servant He is too old to help you were he here. Andromache And yet I sent a message more than once. Servant Do you suppose any of your messengers cared about you? Andromache Of course not! Will you then be messenger? Servant What shall I say being so long from home? Andromache You will find many dodges: you are a woman. Servant There is risk. Hermione is no slouch as guard. Andromache You see? You fail your friends in their misfortune! Servant No, indeed: don't reproach me with that! I will go, since in any case the life of a slave is not much to admire if I do in fact suffer disaster.The servant departs by Eisodos A. Andromache Go then! For my part I shall draw out at length to the upper air the laments and groans and tears to which my whole life is devoted. There is in women is an inborn pleasure in having their present misfortunes
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 56
Enter a female servant from the house. Servant Mistress, I do not shrink from calling you this name since it was the name I thought proper in your house when we lived in the land of Troy. I was well disposed toward you there and to your husband while he lived, and now I have come to you with bad news, in fear that one of the masters might hear of it but out of pity for you: Menelaus is planning dreadful acts against you with his daughter. Against them you must take precaution. Andromache Dearest fellow-slave (for you are fellow-slave to your former mistress, who is now unfortunate), what are they doing? What kind of plans are they weaving now, in their desire to kill me, woman most wretched? Servant They are about to kill your son, unhappy woman, whom you sent secretly out of the house. Menelaus has left the house to fetch him. Andromache Oh me! Has he discovered the son I sent into hiding? How could he have done so? Alas, I am undone! Servant I do not know. But I had this wor
Troy (Turkey) (search for this): card 590
h a young man to another country. Was it for her sake, then, that you led such a great throng to Troy? You ought to have spat her away and not moved a single spear once you had discovered her treachery, should have let her stay in Troy and never taken her back into your house, should have payed her a wage to stay away. But your mind did not sail in this direction: rather, you lost lives many andok on you as murderer of Achilles, as if you were some kind of defiler. You alone came back from Troy unwounded, and your fine armor in its fine case you took to Troy and brought back in the same conTroy and brought back in the same condition. I said to Neoptolemus when he was about to marry that he ought not to contract a marriage-alliance with you or take into his house the foal of such a base mother. For such daughters reproducet foolishly! Were you so in fear that you might not have a worthless wife? And when you had taken Troy (for I shall go there also in my argument), you did not kill your wife when you had her in your p
son Achilles, was Hector's brother, and she was Hector's wife.] Yet you share the same roof with her, you think it right to have her at your table, and you allow her to give birth in your house to children who are your bitterest enemies. And when I, in forethought for you and for me, meant to kill her, I find she is snatched from my hands. Yet come now (it is no shame to touch on this point) if my daughter has no children and Andromache does, will you set them up as kings over the land of Phthia, and will they, though barbarian in race, rule over Greeks? After that can you maintain that I, who hate what is not right, am lacking in judgment, while it is you that have sense? [Consider now this point too. If you had given your daughter to one of your fellow-citizens and she had suffered this kind of treatment, would you sit by in silence? I do not think so. Yet do you, on behalf of a foreigner, shout such things at your close kin? Further, a woman groans as much as a man when she is w
wise take care not to start a quarrel with those near and dear to them. Menelaus How can you maintain that old men are wise, when you, Peleus, son of a famous father and connected by marriage with a man who was once renowned among the Greeks for wisdom, utter words that are disgraceful to yourself and reproachful to me on account of this barbarian woman here? You ought to be driving her off to beyond the Nile's waters or beyond the Phasis—and asking for my help at it too—since she is from Asia where great numbers of Greeks fell before the spear, and she shares in the death of your son, Achilles. [For Paris, who slew your son Achilles, was Hector's brother, and she was Hector's wife.] Yet you share the same roof with her, you think it right to have her at your table, and you allow her to give birth in your house to children who are your bitterest enemies. And when I, in forethought for you and for me, meant to kill her, I find she is snatched from my hands. Yet come now (it is no <
Greece (Greece) (search for this): card 642
ns as much as a man when she is wronged by her mate; so too a man groans when he has a wayward wife in his house. The man's strength lies in his hands, while the woman's interests are defended by her parents and kin. Am I not right then to come to the aid of my own?] You are an old, old man. And when you mention my generalship, you help my case more than you would have by silence. Helen got into trouble not of her own accord but by the will of the gods, and this was a very great service to Hellas. For the Greeks, who were ignorant of weapons and battle, made progress in learning martial courage, and association is the teacher of all things to mortals. And if I forebore, when I came face to face with my wife, to kill her, that was self-control. I could wish that you had not killed Phocus either.Peleus and his brother Telamon killed their half-brother Phocus, son of Aeacus by a nymph. This attack on you I have made in good will toward you, not out of anger. But if you show a hot tempe
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