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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs). Search the whole document.

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Greece (Greece) (search for this): card 297
ith the base, getting pleasure for himself but leaving his children disgrace.] noble birth repels misfortune better than base birth. We ourselves, when we had fallen into the utmost disaster, found friends and kinsmen here, men who, alone of all Hellas, have been these children's champions. Children, give these men your right hands, and you, my friends, give the children yours! Draw near! The children and the Chorus clasp hands. My children, we have put our friends to the test. And so if you eryone your nobility>, and in death, when I die, I shall stand next to Theseus and extoll you in praise and cheer him with this story, that in kindness you took in and defended the children of Heracles and that you enjoy good repute throughout all Hellas and keep your father's reputation and, though born of noble stock, you in no way prove less noble than your father. Of few others can this be said: only one man out of a great multitude can be found who is not inferior to his father. Chorus Lea
Argos (Greece) (search for this): card 297
and the Chorus clasp hands. My children, we have put our friends to the test. And so if you ever return to your country and live in your ancestral home and your patrimony, you must consider for all time as your saviors and friends. Remember never to raise a hostile force against this land, but consider it always your greatest friend. The Athenians are worthy of your reverence seeing that in exchange for us they took the enmity of the great land of Argos and its army, even though they saw that we were wandering beggars [they did not give us up or drive us from the land]. In life , and in death, when I die, I shall stand next to Theseus and extoll you in praise and cheer him with this story, that in kindness you took in and defended the children of Heracles and that you enjoy good repute throughout all Hellas and keep your father's reputation and, though born of noble stock, you in no way prove le