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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley). Search the whole document.

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Athens (Greece) (search for this): book 1, chapter 98
So he built the big and strong walls, one standing inside the next in circles, which are now called Ecbatana.Modern Hamadan, probably; but see Rawlinson's note. This fortress is so designed that each circle of walls is higher than the next outer circle by no more than the height of its battlements; to which plan the site itself, on a hill in the plain, contributes somewhat, but chiefly it was accomplished by skill. There are seven circles in all; within the innermost circle are the palace and the treasuries; and the longest wall is about the length of the wall that surrounds the city of Athens.About eight miles, according to a scholiast's note on Thucyd. ii. 13; but this is disputed. The battlements of the first circle are white, of the second black, of the third circle purple, of the fourth blue, and of the fifth orange: thus the battlements of five circles are painted with colors; and the battlements of the last two circles are coated, the one with silver and the other with gold.
Ecbatana (Iran) (search for this): book 1, chapter 98
wer, he forced the Medes to build him one city and to fortify and care for this more strongly than all the rest. The Medes did this for him, too. So he built the big and strong walls, one standing inside the next in circles, which are now called Ecbatana.Modern Hamadan, probably; but see Rawlinson's note. This fortress is so designed that each circle of walls is higher than the next outer circle by no more than the height of its battlements; to which plan the site itself, on a hill in the plain,Hamadan, probably; but see Rawlinson's note. This fortress is so designed that each circle of walls is higher than the next outer circle by no more than the height of its battlements; to which plan the site itself, on a hill in the plain, contributes somewhat, but chiefly it was accomplished by skill. There are seven circles in all; within the innermost circle are the palace and the treasuries; and the longest wall is about the length of the wall that surrounds the city of Athens.About eight miles, according to a scholiast's note on Thucyd. ii. 13; but this is disputed. The battlements of the first circle are white, of the second black, of the third circle purple, of the fourth blue, and of the fifth orange: thus the battlemen