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ed me to leave the coast. It would seem, then, that as soon as I was out of sight, the Ionians did exactly what their hearts had long been set on. If I had been in Ionia no city would have stirred. Now send me off to Ionia right away, so that I may restore that country to peace and deliver into your hands that vicegerent of MiletusIonia right away, so that I may restore that country to peace and deliver into your hands that vicegerent of Miletus who has devised all this. Then, when I have done this to your satisfaction, I swear by the gods of your royal houseCp. Hdt. 3.65. In the inscription at Persepolis Darius invokes Ormazd and the “gods of his race.” that I will not take off the tunic I am wearing on my arrival in Ionia until I have made Sardo,Sardinia the largest owhen I have done this to your satisfaction, I swear by the gods of your royal houseCp. Hdt. 3.65. In the inscription at Persepolis Darius invokes Ormazd and the “gods of his race.” that I will not take off the tunic I am wearing on my arrival in Ionia until I have made Sardo,Sardinia the largest of the islands, tributary to
Sardinia (Italy) (search for this): book 5, chapter 106
yself, I cannot even go so far as to believe the report that the Milesians and my vicegerent are doing you some dreadful wrong. If, however,it is true that they are engaged in such activities and what you, O king, have heard has a basis in fact, then you can see how unwisely you acted when you forced me to leave the coast. It would seem, then, that as soon as I was out of sight, the Ionians did exactly what their hearts had long been set on. If I had been in Ionia no city would have stirred. Now send me off to Ionia right away, so that I may restore that country to peace and deliver into your hands that vicegerent of Miletus who has devised all this. Then, when I have done this to your satisfaction, I swear by the gods of your royal houseCp. Hdt. 3.65. In the inscription at Persepolis Darius invokes Ormazd and the “gods of his race.” that I will not take off the tunic I am wearing on my arrival in Ionia until I have made Sardo,Sardinia the largest of the islands, tributary to you
After giving this order, he called before him Histiaeus the Milesian, whom Darius had kept with him for a long time now, and said, “I hear, Histiaeus, that the viceregent whom you put in charge of Miletus has done me wrong. He has brought men from the mainland overseas, and persuaded certain Ionians—who shall yet pay me the penalty for their deeds—to follow them and has robbed me of Sardis. Now then, I ask you, do you think that this state of affairs is good? How did such things come to pass without any advice from your side? See to it that you do not have cause to blame yourself hereafter.” To this Histiaeus answered: “My lord, what is this you say—that I and none other should devise a plan as a result of which any harm, great or small, was likely to come to you? What desire or feeling of deprivation would prompt me to do such a thing? All that you have is mine, and I am regarded worthy of hearing all your deliberations. If my vicegerent is indeed doing what you say, be assured
Miletus (Turkey) (search for this): book 5, chapter 106
After giving this order, he called before him Histiaeus the Milesian, whom Darius had kept with him for a long time now, and said, “I hear, Histiaeus, that the viceregent whom you put in charge of Miletus has done me wrong. He has brought men from the mainland overseas, and persuaded certain Ionians—who shall yet pay me the penalty for their deeds—to follow them and has robbed me of Sardis. Now then, I ask you, do you think that this state of affairs is good? How did such things come to pass wt, the Ionians did exactly what their hearts had long been set on. If I had been in Ionia no city would have stirred. Now send me off to Ionia right away, so that I may restore that country to peace and deliver into your hands that vicegerent of Miletus who has devised all this. Then, when I have done this to your satisfaction, I swear by the gods of your royal houseCp. Hdt. 3.65. In the inscription at Persepolis Darius invokes Ormazd and the “gods of his race.” that I will not take off th