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Aetna (Italy) (search for this): card 853
wreck, so that the huge earth groaned. And flame shot forth from the thunderstricken lordin the dim rugged glens of the mount,According to Homer Typhoeus was overwhelmed by Zeus amongst the Arimi in Cilicia. Pindar represents him as buried under Aetna, and Tzetzes read Aetna in this passage.when he was smitten. A great part of huge earth was scorched by the terrible vapor and melted as tin melts when heated by men's art in channelledThe epithet (which means literallywell-bored) seems to refer Aetna in this passage.when he was smitten. A great part of huge earth was scorched by the terrible vapor and melted as tin melts when heated by men's art in channelledThe epithet (which means literallywell-bored) seems to refer to the spout of the crucible.crucibles; or as iron, which is hardest of all things, is shortenedby glowing fire in mountain glens and melts in the divine earth through the strength of Hephaestus.The fire god. There is no reference to volcanic action: iron was smelted on Mount Ida; cp.Epigrams of Homer,ix. 2-4.Even so, then, the earth melted in the glow of the blazing fire. And in the bitterness of his anger Zeus cast him into wide Tartarus. And from Typhoeus come boisterous winds which blow da
Olympus (Greece) (search for this): card 853
So when Zeus had raised up his might and seized his arms, thunder and lightning and lurid thunderbolt,he leaped from Olympus and struck him, and burned all the marvellous heads of the monster about him. But when Zeus had conquered him and lashed him with strokes, Typhoeus was hurled down, a maimed wreck, so that the huge earth groaned. And flame shot forth from the thunderstricken lordin the dim rugged glens of the mount,According to Homer Typhoeus was overwhelmed by Zeus amongst the Arimi in Cilicia. Pindar represents him as buried under Aetna, and Tzetzes read Aetna in this passage.when he was smitten. A great part of huge earth was scorched by the terrible vapor and melted as tin melts when heated by men's art in channelledThe epithet (which means literallywell-bored) seems to refer to the spout of the crucible.crucibles; or as iron, which is hardest of all things, is shortenedby glowing fire in mountain glens and melts in the divine earth through the strength of Hephaestus.The fir
Mount Ida (Jamaica) (search for this): card 853
a in this passage.when he was smitten. A great part of huge earth was scorched by the terrible vapor and melted as tin melts when heated by men's art in channelledThe epithet (which means literallywell-bored) seems to refer to the spout of the crucible.crucibles; or as iron, which is hardest of all things, is shortenedby glowing fire in mountain glens and melts in the divine earth through the strength of Hephaestus.The fire god. There is no reference to volcanic action: iron was smelted on Mount Ida; cp.Epigrams of Homer,ix. 2-4.Even so, then, the earth melted in the glow of the blazing fire. And in the bitterness of his anger Zeus cast him into wide Tartarus. And from Typhoeus come boisterous winds which blow damply,except Notus and Boreas and clear Zephyr. These are a god-sent kind, and a great blessing to men; but the others blow fitfully upon the sea. Some rush upon the misty sea and work great havoc among men with their evil, raging blasts;for varying with the season they blow, s
Cilicia (Turkey) (search for this): card 853
when Zeus had raised up his might and seized his arms, thunder and lightning and lurid thunderbolt,he leaped from Olympus and struck him, and burned all the marvellous heads of the monster about him. But when Zeus had conquered him and lashed him with strokes, Typhoeus was hurled down, a maimed wreck, so that the huge earth groaned. And flame shot forth from the thunderstricken lordin the dim rugged glens of the mount,According to Homer Typhoeus was overwhelmed by Zeus amongst the Arimi in Cilicia. Pindar represents him as buried under Aetna, and Tzetzes read Aetna in this passage.when he was smitten. A great part of huge earth was scorched by the terrible vapor and melted as tin melts when heated by men's art in channelledThe epithet (which means literallywell-bored) seems to refer to the spout of the crucible.crucibles; or as iron, which is hardest of all things, is shortenedby glowing fire in mountain glens and melts in the divine earth through the strength of Hephaestus.The fire