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Kenyon (United Kingdom) (search for this): speech 6, section 33
Ought we then to count them happy in so great an honor?The missing passage from h)/ ti/nes to tw=| pole/mw| has been tentatively restored by Blass and Kenyon to give the following sense: “Neither poets nor philosophers will be in want of words or song in which to celebrate their deeds to Greece. Surely this expedition will be more famed in every land than that which overthrew the Phrygians. Throughout all time in every part of Greece these exploits will be praised in verse and song. Leosthenes himself and those who perished with him in the war will have a double claim to be revered.” .
eat an honor?The missing passage from h)/ ti/nes to tw=| pole/mw| has been tentatively restored by Blass and Kenyon to give the following sense: “Neither poets nor philosophers will be in want of words or song in which to celebrate their deeds to Greece. Surely this expedition will be more famed in every land than that which overthrew the Phrygians. Throughout all time in every part of Greece these exploits will be praised in verse and song. Leosthenes himself and those who perished with him ole/mw| has been tentatively restored by Blass and Kenyon to give the following sense: “Neither poets nor philosophers will be in want of words or song in which to celebrate their deeds to Greece. Surely this expedition will be more famed in every land than that which overthrew the Phrygians. Throughout all time in every part of Greece these exploits will be praised in verse and song. Leosthenes himself and those who perished with him in the war will have a double claim to be revered.”